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ODFW WEEKLY RECREATION REPORT
Fishing, Hunting, Wildlife Viewing
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Southeast Zone Map

Weekly Recreation Report: Southeast Zone

March 28, 2017

 Southeast Zone Fishing

Ana Reservoir hybrid bass
Kelly Tuerffs of Cottage Grove landed this monster 16 lb. hybrid bass at Ana Reservoir.
-Photo courtesy Kelly Tuerffs-

Weekend Fishing Opportunities:

  • A 16-pound hybrid bass was caught at Ana Reservoir recently!
  • The Ana River is turning out trout over 25-inches and is one of the better options for fly-fishing over spring break.
  • The Sprague River is closed to fishing until April 22.
  • Priday and Ana Reservoir will be stocked with trout the week of March 27-31 for Spring Break.
  • The ice is off Krumbo Reservoir and anglers are catching some large trout from the dock and other areas.

Ice-fishing safety

The moderating weather conditions have been having an impact on ice conditions in many areas. With ice thinning and starting to pull away from shore, anglers should be increasingly cautious when stepping out on the ice. Take the following precautions: use the “buddy system,” wear a PFD in case of thin ice, carry a throw-rope, and use a heavy metal staff to check for thin-ice.

REMINDER: The state of Oregon does not allow human-made ice holes larger than 12-inches in diameter or length.

If your favorite fishing spot is no longer listed

It could be the area is closed, inaccessible due to mud or snow, or currently offers limited fishing opportunities. These water bodies will return to the recreation report when conditions change. If you believe something is missing, contact us and we’ll find out why.

Send us your fishing report

We’d love to hear about your recent fishing experience. Send us your own fishing report through ODFW Fishing Reports -- the information will be forwarded to the local biologist who may use it to update various ODFW resources such as the Weekly Recreation Report.

ANA RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout, hybrid bass

This lake is open year round, providing a great opportunity to catch hybrid bass and rainbow trout. A 16-pound hybrid bass was caught recently! Anglers have also been catching rainbow trout as well. The reservoir will be stocked with 3,000 legal trout the Week of March 27. The water level has been lowered due to head gate inspection by the Summer Lake irrigation district, please be careful around any of the water control structures within the reservoir. Water levels should be back to normal by the first week of April. Hybrid bass are targeted successfully using crank baits and fishing bait along the bottom. Hybrid bass larger than 20-inches are not uncommon.

A new state record hybrid bass (white and striped bass cross) was caught in Ana Reservoir on Dec. 10, 2014. The fish was caught using a Rapala crankbait on 10 lb. test line and measured 31½ inches with a girth of 24 inches. The fish weighed 19 lbs. 12 oz. The new state record is 1 ½ inches longer and more than 1 lb. heavier than the previous record of 18 lbs. 9 oz. caught in 2009.

ANA RIVER: hatchery rainbow trout, brown trout

Fishermen have reported catching trout over 25-inches in Ana River recently. Ana River is open year-round and was stocked in November with larger rainbow trout 10 to 13-inches. Fingerlings were also released in the spring and should be approximately 8 to 10-inches. The Ana River is spring fed and rainbow trout are active throughout the year. Anglers can access these trout by floating the river in a float tube or by walking the banks. Bait is allowed.

Caddis flies are the dominant invertebrate. Small blue winged olive (size 18) mayflies should be hatching. Ana River is a great match the hatch fly fishing river with good hatches throughout the winter. Hatches typically occur during the afternoon from 12-3 p.m. the best time. Small mayfly hatches are typically best on overcast days with light rain or snow. Tui chub and pit roach are abundant in the river therefore casting large flies or lures can be effective for catching larger fish.

Ana River is a good TROUT 365 fishery – good trout fishing 365 days a year.

Fishing at Ollala Reservoir
Ice Fishing Today Video.
Click image to play.
- Dave Genz Ice Safety Tips -

ANNIE CREEK: brook trout, brown trout and rainbow trout

Fishing in Annie Creek not recommended at this time due to high flows with ice moving through. Annie Creek turns turbid quickly due to the large watershed and snow in the upper elevations. Access is available off Hwy. 62 at the USFS snow park. There is plenty of public property on USFS, State Forest and Crater Lake National Park -- fishing is regulated by the National Park (541-594-3000).

Several waterfalls occur on the creek inside Crater Lake National Park offering exceptional views. Fishing is very slow due to very cold (34 degrees) and low productivity water. Fishing with bait allowed. Open year-round.

BALM CREEK RESERVOIR: rainbow trout, smallmouth bass, crappie

The reservoir is ice-covered with access only by snowmobile. Fall fish sampling by ODFW indicated that the fingerlings planted last spring have survived and grown well. Fishable numbers of the legal and trophy-sized fish are available as well.

BEULAH RESERVOIR: redband trout, hatchery rainbow trout, whitefish, bull trout

No recent fishing reports. The reservoir is currently at 87 percent of capacity and the boat ramp is useable based on the Bureau of Reclamation website. With the recent rains and warmer weather in the area, the reservoir is very murky and the dam has been opened up to accommodate continued snow melt in the basin.

BIG ROCK RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout

Trout will likely not overwinter due to extremely low water levels.

BLITZEN RIVER: redband trout

The Blitzen River is currently flowing around 210 cfs with water temperatures fluctuating around 41oF. The current conditions for the Blitzen can be checked here. Fishing on the Blitzen is expected to be slow due to recent rains causing the river to run high and the water clarity to be low but recent observations indicate it’s still fishable. Spring is approaching and this will get some of the larger redband moving upstream in search of the spawning grounds so that will bring some new fish into the Page Springs area.

Throughout the winter and early spring, large nymphs and streamers can be used for the larger redband trout. Bead-headed wooly buggers in brown and olive are great winter flies to use on the Blitzen, and a lot of people fish them under a strike indicator. Using larger leaders will also help to pull fish out of tough to reach areas and the redband trout on the Blitzen are not know to be leader shy.

The South Loop Steens Road is still closed for the winter making it difficult to access the upper portions of the Blitzen.

BURNS POND: trout, bass

Fishing has been good for legal-sized rainbow trout recently on the Burns Pond but there have not been any recent reports. There was around 8 inches of ice on the pond and people had reported consistent catches of 12-inch rainbow trout. However, the ice has started to recede and currently, there is around an inch of ice near the middle of the pond with open water surrounding it. Fishing is currently possible with the amount of open water and recent flooding nearby is a good indication that more water will be opening up and the pond will fill this year.

CALAHAN CREEK (LONG CREEK-SYCAN AREA): brook trout and redband trout

Access is blocked by snow. Open all year.

CAMPBELL LAKE: hatchery rainbow trout, brook trout

Access is blocked by snow.

CAMPBELL RESERVOIR: redband trout, largemouth bass, crappie

There are no recent reports on the reservoir.

There are no boat ramps on the reservoir. The southeastern part of the reservoir is on BLM property. The reservoir is fed by water from Deming Creek.

Access is available off the FS 34 (Dairy Creek road) and 335 roads near Bly. Much of the reservoir is on private property so please respect this area.

CHEWAUCAN RIVER: native redband trout, largemouth bass, brown bullhead

The entire river is open all year and fly-fishing for redband trout 6 to 12-inches should be fair upstream of Paisley once the river comes down. Best time to fish is mid-day and dry flies and nymphs are very productive. Bait is allowed downstream of Hwy 31 at Paisley, however the use of bait is prohibited upstream of highway 31. Largemouth bass and brown bullhead are available to anglers at the first Hwy. 31 crossing just north of Valley Falls. Small boats can be launched at this site.

rainbow trout
Rainbow Trout
- Photo by Kevin Clawson-

CHICKAHOMINY RESERVOIR: trout

Fishing reports from last month indicated that fishing was fairly good at Chickahominy with consistent catches of 10-14 inch rainbow trout. There have been no recent fishing reports but the boat ramp is currently useable with all but a few sections of the boat ramp floating. Chickahominy is currently fuller than it has been since 2013/2014 so hopefully this will help to restore the fishery following the prolonged drought in the region.

CORRAL CREEK (SF Sprague): brook trout and brown trout

Access is blocked due to snow.

COTTONWOOD MEADOWS: hatchery rainbow trout, redband trout, brook trout

Access is blocked by snow.

COTTONWOOD RESERVOIR (Lake County): redband trout

Access is blocked by snow. One rainbow trout per day, 15-inch minimum length may be harvested. The reservoir is nearly full and close to spilling.

COW LAKES: largemouth bass, white crappie, brown bullheads, rainbow trout

No recent reports on ice formation or thickness but the Cow Lakes may be frozen over but should be starting to clear up following warmer weather in the region.

A fishing report from last year indicated that fishing was poor in the Cow Lakes. This past summer, ODFW and volunteers sampled the Upper Cow Lake and found an overabundance of brown bullheads. White crappie, bluegill, and large scale suckers were also found with a few of the crappie being very large. Water clarity was poor at the time of sampling. ODFW will continue to monitor conditions in the Cow Lakes to hopefully improve the fishery.

CROOKED CREEK (Klamath Co): redband trout, brook trout and brown trout

Closed to fishing until May 22.

CRYSTAL CREEK redband trout and yellow perch

Closed to fishing until May 22.

DEADHORSE LAKE: hatchery rainbow trout

Access is blocked by snow.

DELINTMENT LAKE: trout

No recent reports on ice formation and thickness. The roads to Delintment Lake have not been plowed so snowmobiles may be the only way to access it until the warmer weather clears things up. Fishing this past summer and fall was good at Delintment Lake but there is a possibility that a fish kill occurred following the heavy snows from this winter. Because of the location and ecology of the lake, fish kills often happen at Delintement and ODFW will monitor the lake when it becomes accessible and jump start the fishery when hatchery fish releases start to occur in the region.

DEMING CREEK: redband trout and bull trout

Access blocked by snow. Open to fishing but closed to fishing for bull trout. Any bull trout captured should not be removed from the water.

DEVILS LAKE (FISHHOLE CREEK): largemouth bass, black crappie, yellow perch, brown bullhead

No recent fishing report.

Dog Lake perch
Dog Lake perch

DOG LAKE: largemouth bass, yellow perch, black crappie, brown bullhead, redband trout

There have been reports of yellow perch caught recently. Yellow perch are the best species to target on this lake in the winter, but crappie, brown bullhead and bass are present. Only one rainbow trout per day, 15-inch minimum length may be harvested.

DUNCAN RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout and brown bullhead catfish

The reservoir is open and was recently spilling. Typically, Duncan Reservoir provides one of the better fishing options during spring break. Fly fishers should fish extremely slow and deep with black midge patterns, which can be effective in late March and early April. A recent illegal introduction of brown bullhead will negatively impact the trout fishery in the future. ODFW encourages the retention of all brown bullhead captured in this fishery.

FISH LAKE (Steens Mountain): rainbow trout, brook trout

The North Loop Steens Road is still closed for the winter making accessing Fish Lake difficult. The Burns District BLM office will open the road when things dry out and mud is not an issue. This may be later than usual this year with the heavy rains the region is experiencing.

FORT CREEK: brown, redband and brook trout

Fort Creek is closed to fishing until May 22.

FOURMILE CREEK (tributary to Agency Lake): brook, brown, and redband trout.

Access is available off Westside Road at Fourmile Springs. A small car topper boat or canoe can improve fishing access at this area. Anglers should be aware of private property around this area and can check Klamath County Land Ownership for information. Bait is allowed.

FOURMILE LAKE: hatchery rainbow trout, lake trout, kokanee, brook trout

Access is blocked by snow.

GERBER RESERVOIR: crappie, yellow perch, brown bullhead and largemouth bass

The reservoir is frozen. Ice conditions are unknown. The reservoir is 76 percent full. Access is good as BLM maintains campgrounds at the reservoir. Fishing is slow. Best fishing is for yellow perch.

HAINES POND: rainbow

The pond is now ice free. There is report of some winterkill. The pond was stocked with pounder and legal-sized rainbow trout mid-October, 2016. First stocking for 2017 will be early to mid-April.

HEART LAKE: hatchery rainbow trout, kokanee, brown bullhead catfish

Access is blocked by snow.

HOLBROOK RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout

Access is blocked by snow. The reservoir’s head gate has been fixed and is currently being filled to store water for next year. There will be enough water to stock rainbow trout in the spring of 2017.

HWY 203 POND: trout, bass, bluegill

The pond is now ice free. First stocking for 2017 will be mid-April.

JACKSON CREEK (UPPER WILLIAMSON RIVER): brook trout

Access likely blocked by snow. Fishing is open and bait allowed. This stream is very small with a large brook trout being 8 inches.

J.C. BOYLE RESERVOIR (Topsy Reservoir): Largemouth bass, yellow perch, brown bullhead, pumpkinseed, crappie, goldfish, Sacramento perch, tui chub and blue chub

Water levels generally remain very similar and drop as the day progresses as water is released for power generation. There are numerous points of access on the reservoir as most property surrounding the reservoir is BLM or PacifiCorp property.

Fishing can be good on days when the water warms quickly during the afternoon. Water temperature is currently peaking at 50 degrees. Fishing for largemouth bass is slow. The reservoir is turbid,therefore anglers should try scent and highly visible lures. Fishing for brown bullhead catfish is likely your best bet and catch rates are currently fair.

Klamath Lake
Klamath Lake Sunset
-Photo by Bob Swingle, ODFW-

UPPER KLAMATH AND AGENCY LAKES: native redband trout and yellow perch

All of Upper Klamath and Agency Lakes are ice-free. Boats can be launched at all boat ramps. Many boat docks have not been placed in the water such as Henzel and Shoalwater Bay. . The lake is 0.7 feet below full pool. Water temperature is peaking at 49 degrees. Fishing is slow but anglers from shore and boat captured fish over the weekend. Water clarity is 1.5 to 2 feet depending on location. Redband trout are scattered. Best success is trolling from a boat. Anglers typically use spoons or plugs that mimic bait fish in the lake such as blue chub, tui chub, fat head minnows or sculpin species. Schools of fat head minnows were observed in some locations in the lake along the bull rush or under overhanging willows. Many anglers fish from shore using dead minnows or night crawlers. Anglers can fish from shore along Howard Bay, Shoalwater Bay, near Link River Trail and Lakeshore Landing.

Petric Park boat ramp is frozen.

KLAMATH RIVER: native rainbow-redband trout

Keno Dam to J.C Boyle Reservoir

Currently, fishing is very slow as fish are likely moving to spawning grounds. Water levels in the Keno Reach of the Klamath River are extremely high at 6,350 cfs. Expect variable daily flows in this section and ODFW recommends checking flows before fishing. This flow is very high for fishing. Water temperatures are increasing slightly and peaking around 49 degrees. Most redband trout are migrating to spawning grounds or spawning at this time.

Access to the river is extremely challenging especially considering the snow. Anglers can drive to the river at the base of Keno Dam using Old Wagon Road on the west side of the river. This road is in disrepair. The other access site is at the PacifiCorp Campground on the east side which is currently closed. Access to the lower river is also available at Sportsman Park. Many anglers access the river on the Hwy. 66 side and hike into the canyon.

Fishing this reach of river is extremely challenging. Most areas require a strenuous hike to reach the river. If you are wading, ODFW highly recommends studded wading boots, wading belt and definitely a wading staff. There are bedrock ledges and numerous very slippery boulders. Typically you can’t see where you are wading as the water is turbid. Polarized glasses also help with wading as you can see boulders. A landing net also assists with landing fish in fast water.

Boats are not recommended on this stretch unless you are an expert oarsman. Roe Outfitters provides fly-fishing trips from rafts in this stretch.

Fishing is very good for redband trout in this reach. Condition and size of redband trout in this reach are exceptional. Most anglers use flies and lures that mimic bait fish. However, flies that mimic leeches and caddisfly larvae work well.

J.C. Boyle Dam to J.C Boyle Powerhouse

Fishing on the Klamath River between JC Boyle Dam to JC Boyle Powerhouse is slow. Flows are extremely high below JC Boyle Dam and currently 3,753 cfs. Most fish in this section are very small and average 10-inches. Below the springs this section remains near a constant 360 cfs of flow and water temperatures are cooler in this section in the summer.

Fishing is best below the spring inputs. The springs start to discharge into the river approximately 1 mile below J.C. Boyle Dam. This section of river requires a hike down steep grade to the river with the exception of the area just above the powerhouse. Fishing is excellent for small redband for those willing to hike. Nymphs and leech patterns work well during this time of year. Occasional blue winger olive mayfly hatches will occur in mid-day especially during inclement weather. Black spinners cast upstream into the pools is also a great technique. Open all year.

J.C. Boyle Powerhouse to State Line with California

Fishing is very slow due to very high flows, 6,360 cfs. Below the JC Boyle powerhouse the fish get slightly larger than the aforementioned reach and average 12 inches but rarely exceed 16 inches. Most fish are in the 6- to 8-inch range. Fishing will be poor. If flow levels are 900 cfs or lower the river is fishable. Flow release estimates are no longer available. Check the USGS real time website for flow information. Klamath River is a good TROUT 365 fishery – good trout fishing 365 days a year.

KRUMBO RESERVOIR: trout, bass

Recent reports indicate the ice is off Krumbo and that anglers are starting to catch some large trout from the dock and other areas. Krumbo can be a great later winter and spring fishery and often produces rainbow trout up to 18-inches long. Please note that only manual or electric powered boats are allowed on Krumbo so please do not use gas powered motors on the reservoir.

The Malheur National Wildlife Refuge does not allow ice fishing on Krumbo Reservoir so please respect these regulations and stay off the ice if it freezes over again. This is a safety regulation because there are numerous springs in Krumbo that can alter the ice conditions and make it dangerous for people to be on.

LAKE OF THE WOODS: hatchery rainbow trout, kokanee, hatchery brown trout, yellow perch, brown bullhead, smallmouth bass, largemouth bass, crappie, tui chub

The lake is frozen but the ice is not safe for ice fishing.

The Lake of the Wood Resort Marina is open Friday through Sunday. Call Lake of the Woods Resort for recent reports Toll Free at 866-201-4194.

Rainbow Trout
Rainbow trout.
-Photo by Justin Miles, ODFW-

LOFTON RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout

Access is blocked by snow.

LONG CREEK (Sycan River): brook trout, redband trout, bull trout

Access is limited due to snow.

LOST RIVER: largemouth bass, brown bullhead, yellow perch, Sacramento perch

The river is ice-free. Fishing for brown bullhead catfish is very slow.

LUCKY RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout

Access is limited to 4-wheel drive vehicles. There have been no recent fishing reports, but fishing will pick up with warming water temperatures. Fingerlings released in 2016 should overwinter and create a great fishery for 2017.

MALHEUR RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout

No recent fishing reports or reports of ice formation on Malheur Reservoir, but the reservoir was accessible last week and is holding water well. It should continue to fill as the warmer weather and rains in the area are expected to continue.

The reservoir dam was repaired and started holding water again in November of 2015. The reservoir was stocked with legal-sized and fingerling rainbow trout in the spring of 2016 to jump start the fishery following prolonged drought conditions in the region.

MALHEUR RIVER (from the South Fork Malheur River near Riverside, downstream to Gold Creek): redband trout and hatchery rainbow trout.

No recent fishing reports.

MALHEUR RIVER, NORTH FORK: redband trout, whitefish, and bull trout

No recent fishing reports.

MALHEUR RIVER, MIDDLE FORK: redband trout, brook trout, and bull trout

No recent fishing reports.

MANN LAKE: cutthroat trout

No recent fishing reports but the lake is free of ice. Mann Lake and the rest of the east Steens region is still fairly dry and has not been experiencing the same flooding and wet conditions the rest of the region has. Reports indicate that there is still a decent amount of snow in the watershed and we are expecting conditions to improve as we move into the spring. Reports from earlier this winter indicated that the water was very low and there was only a foot of water below the ice in most places. The delayed filling of Mann Lake may be partially due to the depleted groundwater storage following prolonged drought conditions in the region. Hopefully this winter was enough to recharge things and restore the lake and provide better conditions for the fishery.

Currently, there are only two different age classes of cutthroat trout in Mann Lake. It was stocked in 2012 following the removal of invasive goldfish and it was slated to be stocked again in 2014 but a disease outbreak at the hatchery prevented these fish from being stocked. It was stocked with fingerling cutthroat trout in the spring of 2016 so these fish should be available to anglers this spring. ODFW will continue to monitor the lake this spring to determine how the fishery has responded to the less than ideal conditions.

Fathead minnows were found in Mann Lake this past summer and have been giving fisherman concern. At the moment, it does not appear that the population of fathead minnows is negatively affecting the fishery but ODFW will continue to monitor the lake.

MILL FLAT POND: hatchery rainbow trout, largemouth bass

Access is probably limited due to snow. Bass have been illegally introduced and are negatively impacting the hatchery rainbow trout. Bass up to 6 pounds have been caught in 2016.

MILLER LAKE: brown trout, kokanee, rainbow trout, brook trout

Access to the lake is blocked by snow.

MUD LAKE: hatchery rainbow trout

The reservoir was reported spilling this past week. It is likely no fish survived from 2016, but the reservoir will be stocked with fingerlings again in 2017.

MURRAY RESERVOIR: trout

No recent reports on ice conditions.

NORTH POWDER POND: rainbow trout

No recent reports on ice conditions. The access road remains impassable due to snow drifts. The pond was stocked with pounder-sized rainbow trout mid-October. First stocking for 2017 will be mid-April.

OVERTON RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout

Access is blocked by snow.

Black Crappie
Black Crappie
-U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service-

OWYHEE RESERVOIR: largemouth and smallmouth bass, crappie, yellow perch, catfish

The Owyhee Reservoir is currently at 93 percent of capacity and the managers have been releasing extra water through the dam and the glory hole spillway in an attempt to accommodate heavy flows entering the reservoir. There have been no recent fishing reports for the Owyhee Reservoir but fishing is expected to be slow in these conditions.

Reports from the summer of 2016 indicated that there were a lot of dead carp in the reservoir but there were no reports of other fish species dying. ODFW investigated and took water samples and found areas that contained lethal dissolved oxygen levels so this was likely the cause of dying carp. Since carp were actively spawning, they were moving into the shallower areas where there was more algae and less oxygen and getting trapped while other species moved into areas that contained adequate oxygen.

The Owyhee Dam boat ramp is permanently closed due to safety concerns. The Gordon Gulch boat ramp is currently open and the Indian Creek boat ramp is likely open as well.

OWYHEE RIVER (Lower): brown trout and hatchery rainbow trout

Water releases below the dam have been increased to around 1,920 cfs according to the USGS stream data. Fishing will be difficult or impossible with these conditions. There is an abundance of water entering the reservoir so it is expected that river flows will remain high in an attempt to control the reservoir.

OWYHEE RIVER (Upper): smallmouth bass and channel catfish

No recent fishing reports, but fishing is expected to be slow.

Ice Fishing at Paiute Reservoir
Ice Fishing at Paiute Reservoir
-Photo by Shannon Hurn, ODFW-

PAIUTE RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout

There have not been any recent fishing reports, but there should be open water this weekend. Over winter survival should be higher than previous years due to higher water level.

PHILLIPS RESERVOIR: trout, perch

Reservoir is covered with ice but there is a narrow band of open water around the perimeter due to rising water level. Ice cover will likely remain on the lake until mid-April. Storage is at 17 percent of capacity and increasing. Snow has been removed from the access road to the boat launch adjacent to Mason Dam.

A total of 4,000 trophy-sized and approximately 10,500 legal-sized rainbow trout were released spring 2016. September sampling by ODFW indicated that good numbers of the trophies are available and they are in very good condition. Good numbers of carryovers from past stocking of legal-sized trout are also available averaging 12-14 inches and are also in very good condition. To measure the catch rate of the trophy’s, ODFW marked approximately 400 of these with an orange colored tag, just under the dorsal fin. If you catch one of these tagged fish, please report the tag number to Tim Bailey, District Fish Biologist at 541-962-1829. Some of these tags will have a $50 reward available.

PILCHER RESERVOIR:

Due to a rule change in 2016, the reservoir is open to fishing year-round. The reservoir is covered with ice, but perimeter ice is softening. County crews have plowed snow from Tucker Flat Road and from the access road and parking area at the reservoir. However, there is 2-3 feet of snow at the reservoir, so getting from the parking area to the reservoir will require some effort.

PINE CREEK and tributaries (Snake River tributary): rainbow trout, brook trout

Pine Creek and tributaries are open to trout fishing year-round, with a five-rainbow trout bag limit.

POISON CREEK RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout

No recent fishing reports or reports of ice formation and thickness. Poison Creek Reservoir likely has a small amount of ice on it but the warmer weather and rain in the region should open things up soon.

Fishing in the summer of 2016 on Poison Creek Reservoir was slow but anglers did report catching large rainbow trout. The reservoir is unique in that it has a very robust population of large macroinvertebrates and this helps the trout to grow big rather quickly. The abundance of food for these trout may also be the reason that fishing is slow because the fish do not need to go far to find food so they move around less.

POLE CREEK RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout, crappie

No recent fishing reports. Pole Creek is filling up and the conditions are expected to be better this year than the last two years.

PRIDAY RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout

The reservoir will be stocked with trophy trout on the week of March 27. Legal and fingerling rainbow trout stocked in 2016 should have overwintered and create a good fishery this year. Priday Reservoir is mostly on BLM property between Plush and Adel. Please respect the private property on the reservoir and stay on the main road.

ROGGER POND: hatchery rainbow trout

Access is blocked by snow.

Brown Trout
Brown Trout
-Photo by Patti Abbot-

SAND AND SCOTT CREEKS: brook trout and brown trout

Sand and Scott creeks are very small spring fed streams west of Hwy 97 near the Silver Lake highway junction. Fishing on these small streams is open year-round with bait allowed. Most fish are less than 8-inches long.

SEVENMILE CREEK: brook trout, brown trout, redband trout

Flows are high. Fishing is slow for 6- to 8-inch brook trout. Anglers can access Sevenmile Creek at Nicholson Road and fish upstream of Nicholson Road. Bait is allowed upstream of Nicholson Road. Flows are high and water temperatures are cold. Fishing is best in the beaver dam pools above Nicholson Road. The bridge crossing Sevenmile Creek at Nicholson Road is closed. Open all year.

SKY LAKES AND MOUNTAIN LAKE WILDERNESS: brook trout and rainbow trout

Access is blocked by snow. Fishing is not recommended at this time.

SHERLOCK GULCH RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout

There have been no fishing reports this year. Fingerling rainbow trout were stocked in 2016 and should be in the 8- to 12-inches range this spring.

SID LUCE RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout

Access is blocked by muddy roads and possibly high water on both Colvin and Snyder Creeks. There have been no recent fishing reports, but it has been spilling for some time now.

SPAULDING RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout

The reservoir was dry in 2015 and 2016. Recent reports indicate the reservoir is full. If so, it will likely get stocked with fingerling rainbow trout in 2017.

SPENCER CREEK: redband trout and brook trout

Spencer Creek is closed to fishing until May 22.

SPRING CREEK: redband trout, brown trout, brook trout

Spring Creek is closed to fishing until May 22. Spawning redband trout can be observed in the picnic area upstream of the Logging Museum at Collier State Park.

SPRAGUE RIVER: redband trout, brown trout, largemouth bass and yellow perch

The Sprague River is closed to fishing until April 22 to protect spawning redband trout. All tributaries to the Sprague River including Trout Creek, Sycan River, NF Sprague, Fivemile Creek, and SF Sprague remain open to fishing.

NORTH FORK SPRAGUE RIVER AND ALL TRIBUTARIES: brook trout, redband trout, brown trout, bull trout

Access is challenging to most areas of the NF Sprague River due to snow.

Fishing through the canyon is slow. Access to this area is challenging as is wading through the high gradient areas. Open all year. Flow has increased through the canyon to 367 cfs. Larger brown trout and redband trout occur in this section.

SOUTH FORK SPRAGUE RIVER AND ALL TRIBUTARIES: brook trout, redband trout, brown trout, bull trout

Access is limited due to snow. The South Fork Sprague River is open to fishing all year. Fishing is very slow in most areas due to low fish densities. Flow is very high (416 cfs) at the USFS day use park east of Bly.

SUMMIT PRAIRIE POND: hatchery rainbow trout

Access is blocked by snow.

SUN CREEK: brook trout, bull trout, brown trout

Sun Creek is closed to fishing for bull trout. Only bull trout occur in upper Sun Creek just above the Sun Pass Forest bridge crossing. Angling not recommended at this time.

Redband trout were reintroduced to Sun Creek. These redband trout were small, most less than four inches, and salvaged from the Wood River irrigation system. The Sun Creek channel will be rerouted into the historic channel this summer.

SYCAN RIVER: brook trout, redband trout, brown trout (below marsh)

Access is very challenging to the lower river and snow is blocking access to the upper river. Fishing is very slow below the marsh as most of the river desiccated in summer of 2015. Flows are very high and have increased to 2,410 cfs.

THOMPSON VALLEY RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout, largemouth bass

Access is blocked by snow on FS road 27, but you might be able to drive up FS road 28 and hike a short way into this reservoir.

THIEF VALLEY RESERVOIR: trout

The reservoir was drained completely by the Lower Powder River Irrigation District in mid-August 2016. While the reservoir is now at capacity, ODFW will not restock the reservoir with rainbow trout until mid-April 2017.

UNITY RESERVOIR: trout, bass, crappie

The ice cover is beginning to melt and reservoir water level is increasing rapidly due to inflow. There is a band of open water around the perimeter and larger areas of open water at inlets. Open water during ice-out can provide some very productive trout fishing. Reservoir storage is at 70 percent of capacity.

VEE LAKE: hatchery rainbow trout

Access is blocked by snow.

WARM SPRINGS RESERVOIR: smallmouth bass, crappie, catfish, perch, rainbow trout

No recent fishing reports but the reservoir is clear of ice. The reservoir is currently at 84 percent of capacity. The roads into Warm Springs Reservoir can become unpassable when they are muddy or snowy so use caution when venturing out to this reservoir and always carry chains and other emergency equipment.

WARNER POND: hatchery rainbow trout

Access is available. This pond is very productive and should be fished earlier in the season before vegetation takes over.

Brook Trout
Brook Trout
-Photo by Kevin Clawson-

UPPER WILLIAMSON RIVER: redband trout and brook trout

The Upper Williamson River above Kirk Bridge is closed to fishing until April 22.

LOWER WILLIAMSON RIVER: redband trout and brown trout

The lower Williamson below Kirk Bridge is closed to fishing until May 22.

WILLOW VALLEY RESERVOIR: largemouth bass, crappie, yellow perch, bluegill, Lahontan cutthroat

There have been no recent fishing reports. The Reservoir is spilling. Fishing for largemouth bass can be good in late March in the Creek channel. Best fishing is from a boat. Launching a boat might be problematic due to high reservoir levels. Bring waders or rubber boots to launch. Crappie are rare in the reservoir but can be found suspended near the large wood placement and spider block structures. Bluegill are abundant in the shallows but typically small and difficult to capture. Lahontan cutthroat are very rare. Yellow perch can be the most dominant fish in the reservoir but tend to stunt resulting in very small adult size (6 inches). The reservoir is turbid.

WOLF CREEK RESERVOIR: crappie, trout

The reservoir is covered with ice but there is a band of open water around the perimeter. Access to the parking area has been plowed of snow. Fishing has been good for rainbow trout 11 to 14 inches.

WOOD RIVER: redband, brown, brook and bull trout

The Wood River is closed to fishing until April 22.

YELLOWJACKET LAKE: trout

Recent reports indicate that fishing is very slow at Yellowjacket Lake. A few people used snowmobiles to access the lake in early February and did not catch any fish in a few different locations. ODFW will monitor Yellowjacket Lake when access improves to evaluate any negative effects of winter.

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  Southeast Zone Hunting

OPEN: COUGAR

Howling Wolf
Gray Wolf

Wolves and coyotes can look alike

Most wolves in the state today are in northeast Oregon but a few have dispersed further west and south. Wolves are protected by state and/or federal law and it is unlawful to shoot them. Coyote hunters need to take extra care to identify their target as wolves can look like coyotes, especially wolf pups in the mid-summer and fall. Please report any wolf sightings or wolf sign to ODFW using the online reporting system.

Use the Oregon Hunting Map to see where to hunt.

HARNEY COUNTY

Winter conditions: Motorized access is limited to plowed roads due to mud and/or snow.

Coyote populations are good throughout Harney County. Pair bonds have formed and calls mimicking coyote vocalizations are most effective.

Cougar hunting is open year around. Populations are healthy and distributed throughout the district in any area with a big game prey base. Cougars at this time of year are generally concentrated along with their primary prey of deer and elk. Don’t forget successful hunters must check-in cougars no more than 10 days after harvest; please bring cougar in thawed and with mouth propped open so that field staff can quickly process the animal and get you on your way.

Shed Hunting. Mule deer bucks have lost their antlers. Shed hunters are reminded that once an antler falls off it legally becomes the property of the landowner. Therefore shed hunters need to get permission from private landowners to access their property and pick up sheds.

Ground squirrels are becoming more active on warmer days. Be sure to obtain permission when entering private lands.

KLAMATH COUNTY

Ground Squirrels – squirrels are starting to emerge on warmer days. Be sure to obtain permission before entering private lands.

Cougar - Hunting is open. Populations are healthy and distributed throughout the district in any area with a big game prey base. Deer and elk are now occupying lower elevation winter ranges, and cougars often follow this prey base and become more concentrated themselves in these lower elevation areas. Use of predator calls and snow tracking are great hunting techniques during the winter period. Don’t forget successful hunters must check-in cougars no more than 10 days after harvest; please bring cougar in thawed and with mouth propped open so that field staff can quickly process the animal and get you on your way. Remember a 2017 cougar tag and hunting license is needed to hunt.

COYOTE hunting opportunities are improving as coyotes are now more concentrated at lower elevation areas where big game animals are wintering. Be aware that bobcats and cougars may respond to predator calls, and separate licensing and open season limitations exist for these species. Please consult the annual hunting synopsis for further information.

KLAMATH WILDLIFE AREA

Updated March 21, 2017

Miller Island Unit

The Miller Island Unit is located 6 miles south and west of Klamath Falls.

Posted safety zones are closed to all hunting.

Feb. 1-April 30

Public use is restricted to public roads, parking areas, boat ramp, designated birding trail and designated dog training area to minimize disturbance to migrating waterfowl.

Gorr Island Unit

Gorr Island is located four miles south of the Miller Island Unit in the Klamath River, accessible only by boat. Gorr Island is open daily with no permit required during authorized seasons.

Shoalwater Bay Unit and Sesti Tgawaals Unit

Shoalwater Bay and Sesti Tgawaals are both located on the west side of Upper Klamath Lake approximately 10 miles to the north and west of Klamath Falls. Shoalwater Bay and Sesti Tgawaals Units are both open for hunting daily with no permit required during authorized seasons.

Non-toxic shot is required for hunting on all units of the Klamath Wildlife Area.

Waterfowl and Upland Hunting Information

Currently all waterfowl and upland hunting seasons are closed.

Weekly and summarized harvest statistics can be found at: ODFW Klamath Wildlife Area Harvest Summaries

A Wildlife Area Parking Permit is now required to park on the Wildlife Area. Cost is $10 daily or $30 annually. Free with purchase of hunting license; just be sure to put it on your dashboard. Buy online or at an ODFW office that sells licenses or at a license sales agent.

Overnight camping is not allowed on the Miller Island Unit.

If you have any questions, please contact Klamath Wildlife Area at (541) 883-5732.

LAKE COUNTY

Winter Conditions: Motorized access is limited to paved or all weather gravel roads due to mud and/or snow.

Cougar populations are good and most individuals have moved to lower elevations as deer are still on winter range. Finding a fresh kill and then calling in the vicinity is the best option for harvesting a cougar.

Coyote hunting is available throughout the district. Be aware that bobcats and cougars may respond to predator calls, and separate licensing and season limitations exist for these species.

Shed Hunting. Mule deer bucks are losing their antlers. With the continued snow conditions deer are still restricted to traditional winter ranges. Just as antlers begin to drop, deer and elk are at their poorest physical condition. They are using more energy than poor winter forage can replace. So when shed hunters inadvertently push or spook animals the additional energy expenditure could be enough to cause death due to malnutrition. You might consider doing the deer and elk a favor by waiting to search for dropped antlers until later in the spring. Shed hunters are reminded that once an antler falls off it legally becomes the property of the landowner. Therefore shed hunters need to get permission from private landowners to access their property and pick up sheds.

Summer Lake Wildlife Area

Sunrise on Winter Rim at Summer Lake Wildlife Area
- Photo by Keith Kohl-

SUMMER LAKE WILDLIFE AREA

Updated March 7, 2017

ALL GENERAL HUNTING SEASONS ARE NOW OVER, AND DISCHARGING FIREARMS IS PROHIBITED, except by special access permit.

Please contact Summer Lake Wildlife Area at (541) 943-3152 or email martin.j.stlouis@state.or.us for additional information.

MALHEUR COUNTY

The northern portion of Malheur County is still covered in snow and access off main roads is very limited.

Cougar hunting is open. Populations are healthy and distributed throughout the district in any area with a big game prey base. Successful hunters must check-in cougars no more than 10 days after harvest; please bring cougar in thawed and with mouth propped open for easier tissue sampling, teeth collection and tagging.

Coyote hunting is available throughout the district. Reproduction this year appears to be good which should enhance calling opportunities. Be aware that bobcats and cougars may respond to predator calls, and separate licensing and season limitations exist for these species.

Ground squirrels are becoming more active on warmer days. Be sure to obtain permission when entering private lands.

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 Southeast Zone Wildlife Viewing

HARNEY COUNTY

EVENT: The 36th Annual John Scharff Migratory Bird Festival, April 6-9 2017, Burns

Spend an amazing weekend witnessing the spectacular spring migration in the Harney Basin of Southeast Oregon. View thousands of migratory birds as they rest and feed in the wide open spaces of Oregon's high desert. From waterfowl to shorebirds, cranes to raptors, wading birds to songbirds, you'll see it all!

The festival offers non-stop birding activities as well as historical and cultural information sure to entertain you and your family. So whether you're a beginner or a life-long wildlife enthusiast, the festival has something for everyone. More information

Spring migration is well underway and large numbers of snow geese, Ross’s geese, and sandhill cranes can be found in agricultural fields throughout the Harney Basin. Pintail, shoveler, wigeon, goldeneye, mallard, green-winged teal and cinnamon teal can also be found throughout the basin.

Shorebird migration is just beginning and should improve over the next few weeks as spring migration progresses. Lesser yellow legs and killdeer are some species that have already arrived.

Wintering passerine species (dark eyed juncos and house finches) are still fairly active around the county. Spring passerine migrants should be increasing in diversity and number as the season progresses. Spotted towhees, red-winged blackbirds and white-crowned sparrows are a few that have already started to show up.

Raptors continue to be found throughout the area. You should be able to view golden eagles, bald eagles and a variety of hawks perching on telephone poles and fence posts throughout the district. Resident raptors such as northern harriers and red-tailed hawks are very easily observed in open agricultural areas along with rough-legged hawks and an occasional ferruginous.

Sage grouse are actively attending leks. Binoculars or spotting scopes are needed to observe sage grouse as getting close to the leks will flush the birds.

Viewing opportunities around Burns/Hines and at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge will continue to improve as migration continues to develop and more species of passerines and breeding water birds arrive in the area.

Bighorn sheep
Bighorn Ram
-Photo by Pat Matthews-

Many of the bighorn sheep will be using lower elevation slopes and can often be seen from the highways. Bighorn sheep may be seen from highway 205 along Catlow Valley or along the East Steens Road. 3/20/2017

Klamath Falls Area

Spring migration is in full swing with new arrivals daily in the Klamath Basin. Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge offers great viewing opportunities for tundra swans, white-fronted, snow, and Ross’ geese. In addition, county access roads between Miller Island Rd and Stateline Rd may offer opportunities to observe large numbers of migratory geese foraging in agricultural fields or roosting on ponds and rivers in the area. Numbers of migrating geese within the basin are increasing weekly.

Wintering raptors can be found around the Lower Klamath Basin including bald eagles, golden eagles, rough-legged hawks and red-tailed hawks. Best viewing opportunities are near the state line area or around Yonna, Poe, and Langell Valleys east of Klamath Falls.

The Link River Trail offers great viewing opportunities for aquatic birds including great blue-heron, common goldeneye, Canada geese, bufflehead, and common merganser.

Mule deer can be found concentrated on lower elevation winter ranges. Some key migration corridors and wintering areas are under restricted motorized access to protect the integrity of those areas during this critical time of year. Use caution driving near wintering areas, and please respect seasonal road closures. 3/14/2017

KLAMATH WILDLIFE AREA (Miller Island Unit)

Updated March 21, 2017

Viewers need to be aware road conditions can be poor at this time due to recent snow and rainfall events. Please use extreme caution because of the soft and muddy conditions especially along road edges.

Feb. 1 – Apr. 30

Public use is restricted to public roads, parking areas, boat ramp, designated birding trail and designated dog training area to minimize disturbance to migrating waterfowl.

Waterfowl

Flocks of Western Canada Geese can be found scattered across the area, many are starting to pair up and stake out nesting territories. White (Ross’s and Snow) and White-fronted geese have started to show up on their migration north. Approximately 20,000 white and 10,000 white-fronted geese were observed using the area over the past week. Majority of the white geese counted were Ross’s geese. Spring migratory goose numbers and use of the area should continue to stay the same during the following weeks.

Tundra swan numbers are decreasing, but some can still be found scattered around the area. The Occasional trumpeter swan can be located on the Miller Island Unit.

Numbers of dabbling ducks are still increasing, as migrants continue to show up. Pintail, mallard, wigeon, gadwall, American green-winged teal and northern shovelers can be seen in good numbers scattered across the area. Cinnamon teal continue to increase in numbers. Diver species such as: canvasback, bufflehead, common and barrows goldeneye, ruddy duck, ring-necked duck and scaup species are becoming a common sight on the area, and can be found most anywhere. Common and hooded mergansers can sometimes be observed using the Klamath River.

Shorebirds, waders and other waterbirds

Shorebird numbers remain low. Killdeer, yellow-legged species and black-necked stilts are becoming more abundant around the area. Dunlin and western sandpipers have been observed recently. Great blue heron, black-crowned night heron and American bitterns can be seen scattered around the area. American white pelicans have started to show up, but are still in low numbers. Sandhill cranes continue to increase in numbers. Virginia rails heard more often than seen can also be located.

Raptors

Sharpshinned Hawk
Sharpshinned Hawk
-Photo by Charlotte Ganskopp-

Great horned and barn owls can be seen at dusk. Red-tailed hawks, rough-legged, northern harriers, cooper hawks, Ferruginous hawks, sharp-shinned, American kestrels, prairie falcons can all be seen foraging throughout the wildlife area. The occasional peregrine falcon can also be observed using old power poles overlooking the wetlands. Common ravens are quite numerous at this time. Eagle species numbers continue to increase and are becoming quite common. Osprey have been recently observed using Miller Island.

Turkey vultures were observed during the week.

Upland Game Birds

California quail and ring-necked pheasant can be found scattered around the old homesteads and the headquarters area. Several chukar can be seen around the HQ area.

Passerines

Eurasian collared dove can be found scattered over the area. Over the last couple of weeks large numbers of mourning dove have shown up.

American and lesser goldfinches, house finches, mountain chickadees, American robins, both brewers and red-winged black birds, spotted towhees, white-breasted nuthatches, black-billed magpies, western meadow larks and Northern flickers continue to be a common site throughout the area. Dark-eyed juncos, white-crowned and golden crowned sparrows are also common sites on the wildlife area. Tree swallow numbers continue to increase as they have already started squabbling over the best bird houses. Swallow species and numbers should continue to increase as spring progresses. The occasional Says phoebe can be spotted fly catching from fences and shrubs.

Marsh wrens and song sparrows can be found in dense stands of tall emergent hard stem bulrush and broad-leaf cattail.

The occasional horned lark can be spotted on the wildlife areas agricultural fields.

A Wildlife Area Parking Permit is now required to park on the Wildlife Area. Cost is $10 daily or $30 annually. Free with purchase of hunting license; just be sure to put it on your dashboard. Buy online or at an ODFW office that sells licenses or at a license sales agent.

Overnight camping is not allowed on the Miller Island Unit.

If you have any questions, please contact Klamath Wildlife Area at (541) 883-5732.

LAKE COUNTY

Tundra Swans, Snow Geese and White-fronted Geese are concentrated in flooded hay meadows in the Chewaucan, Goose Lake and Warner Valleys as well as Paulina Marsh. Early migrant ducks, Lesser Sandhill Crane and the larger gulls and terns are starting to show up. It is the time of year when new species are arriving every day.

The spring green up has started and deer are concentrated on lower elevation winter ranges. Be advised that most of the winter ranges and accessible areas in the valleys are privately owned and viewers should get permission prior to entering private land.

SUMMER LAKE WILDLIFE AREA

This section was updated on March 27, 2017.

New 2017 Wildlife Area Parking permits are required for all users of Summer Lake Wildlife Area. Parking permits can be purchased at any ODFW license agent (pdf) or through the ODFW website. The cost is $10.00 daily or $30.00 annually and is valid on all ODFW Wildlife Areas. Locally, parking permits can be purchased at the Summer Lake Store, 1.3 miles north of Headquarters.

Motor vehicle access on major dike roads (Bullgate and Windbreak) closed on March 15, 2017, but the Wildlife Viewing Loop remains open. The Wildlife Viewing Loop road now follows the main route on the south side of Link Canal from Bullgate Campground out to Link Corner. Viewers need to be aware road conditions can be poor this time of year due to snow and rainfall events. Please use caution because of the soft and muddy conditions especially along road edges. Roads leading into campgrounds are generally good. Road work improvements are being conducted along link canal, deepwater canal and Schoolhouse Lake. Parking areas are also being developed and caution should be used around heavy equipment.

Wildlife viewing is improving with the arrival northward migrants, especially migrating waterfowl.

Waterfowl

Waterfowl populations continue to stage and migrate through the area in good numbers.

Canada Geese
Canada Geese
- Photo by Bob Swingle, ODFW-

Western Canada geese are widely distributed across the wildlife area, and many are beginning to form breeding pairs and establish nesting territories. Canada geese have begun to actively sit on nests.

Lesser snow and greater white-fronted geese are beginning to decrease in abundance as these migrants disperse further north to other staging areas and breeding grounds. White-fronted geese numbers should remain relatively high until mid to late April.

Duck numbers continue to increase as the spring migration continues. In addition to northern pintail, migrant canvasback, northern shoveler and ruddy ducks are staging in large numbers. Last week, 15 species of ducks were observed. Cinnamon and green-wing teal numbers are also increasing in abundance. American wigeon numbers have steadily been increasing and mallard pairs are establishing nesting sites.

Migrant swan numbers have decreased substantially, 232 were found last week. Swan numbers are beginning to drop as these early migrants depart enroute to more northerly staging areas. A few resident and non-breeding trumpeter swans remain widely scattered across the wildlife area. Some of these birds are part of restoration efforts and will be neck-banded with green collars and white alphanumeric symbols. Viewers are encouraged to “read” the collars and report them to wildlife area personnel. Collars will have the Greek letter Theta (Ѳ) or the symbol “@” and two numerals that are read from the body toward the head.

Shorebirds, waders and other waterbirds

Early migrant shorebirds are beginning to arrive. Greater yellowlegs were observed as well as a good number of killdeer. Shorebird diversity is increasing with American avocets, black-necked stilts, dunlins and a marbled godwit observed over the last week. American avocet numbers are increasing and the first Long-billed curlew was observed over the weekend. The overall number of shorebirds still remains low, but viewing opportunities will continue to improve.

American coot numbers are increasing at this time, nearly 2,700 were found on the weekly count. Sandhill cranes continue to arrive and disperse onto traditional nesting territories and several pairs are becoming vocal.

Gull numbers are increasing and are widespread across the wildlife area. Ring-billed gulls are the predominant species, but California gulls have also been observed. The tern island in east link, on the east side of the viewing loop is a good spot to view higher concentrations of gulls. American white pelicans have also arrived and smaller flocks are being observed on the north end of the wildlife area.

Very few migrant or returning grebes are present, but the occasional wintering individual can be still be found; 4 species (eared, horned, pied-billed and Western) should be present and are best viewed at Ana Reservoir and from the Schoolhouse Lake Viewing Blind. A Clark’s grebe was also observed in Gold Dike Impoundment during the weekly count.

Great blue and black-crowned night herons are still present in average, but low numbers. American bittern have been seen on a fairly regular basis over the past week.

Raptors and others

Northern harriers and red-tailed and rough-legged hawks are common this time of the year. Sharp-shinned and coopers hawks have also recently been observed. Bald and golden eagles, American kestrel, peregrine and prairie falcons can occasionally be found. Bald and golden eagle numbers are fairly high now as they are attracted to the large number of staging waterfowl, one of their preferred food sources.

Accipiters are frequently found around Headquarters where other birds are being fed.
Great horned owls are found scattered across the entire wildlife area, especially in the trees at campgrounds. Breeding season is well underway for great-horned owls and hooting is very common in the evening hours. Common barn and sometimes short-eared owls can occasionally be observed near dusk.

Upland game birds

Good numbers of California quail can be found and a few pheasants can sometimes be observed, especially around old homesteads on the north end of the wildlife area.

Passerines

Eurasian collared doves remain very numerous at Headquarters Complex. Mourning doves are found in low numbers scattered across the wildlife area.

American Golcfinch
American Golcfinch Male
- Photo by Dave Budeau-

American and lesser goldfinches are present in low numbers at Headquarters. Very few migrant sparrows are present at this time, but sparrow observations are increasing and the first Savannah sparrow was recently observed at Avey Channel. Tree swallows are widely distributed across the wildlife area and Cliff swallows were observed for the first time last week. Swallow numbers and diversity continue to increase. The first white-crowned and golden-crowned sparrows were recently observed at the headquarters complex.

Say’s phoebes continue to be observed, other early migrants should be appearing soon.

American robins, loggerhead and northern shrikes, Stellar’ s and scrub jays, and cedar waxwings are being observed in varied numbers across the wildlife area.

Red-breasted and sometimes red-naped sapsuckers as well as other woodpeckers can be found in the trees around Headquarters. Northern flickers remain common across most of the area, and wintering Townsend’s solitaires are fairly abundant.

Marsh wrens and song sparrows can be found in fair numbers in dense stands of hardstem bulrush and broad-leaved cattail along dikes and levees throughout the wetlands.

Red-winged blackbirds have returned to the area, moderate sized flocks were found last week and increasing numbers have returned to the feeder at Headquarters. Yellow-headed blackbirds have also returned and are quickly increasing in abundance.

European starlings are increasing number and are actively singing and exploring nest cavities.

Facilities and Access

Please remember: Calendar year 2017 parking permits are required beginning on January 1, 2017!

Summer Lake Wildlife Area requires a $10 daily parking permit or a $30 annual parking permit. Parking permits can be purchased at any Point of Sale Agent or through the ODFW website. Locally, parking permits can be purchased at the Summer Lake Store, 1.3 miles north of Headquarters.

Motor vehicle access on major dike roads (Bullgate and Windbreak) closed on March 15, 2017, but the Wildlife Viewing Loop remains open. The Wildlife Viewing Loop road has reopened on the south side of link canal from Bullgate Campground out to Link Corner.

Please be aware road conditions can be poor at this time of year due to snow and rainfall events. Roads may be soft and muddy, especially along edges. However, roads leading to campgrounds are in good condition.

Camping is permitted at four sites on the Wildlife Area. Campgrounds are primitive but each has vault toilets, trash barrels and a few picnic tables.

Habitat

The Area’s wetland units are very well flooded at this time. Extensive shallowly flooded sheetwater areas are providing excellent foraging opportunities for a variety of waterfowl.

Emergent marsh vegetation has lodged-over allowing for good visibility into the interior of many wetland units.

Muskrat houses are very obvious now and are frequently used by many species of birds.

Summer Lake continues to increase in size at this time.

Upland habitat remains in very good condition, forbs and grasses remain erect with an abundance of seeds. Green-up of several grass and small forb species is very apparent. Planted tree and shrubs in plots and the orchard have produced a good amount of fruit and are providing excellent sheltered sites and food resources for wildlife. Trees and shrubs are beginning to bud with warming temperatures and longer days.

Please contact Summer Lake Wildlife Area at (541) 943-3152 or e-mail martin.j.stlouis@state.or.us for additional information.

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   © ODFW. All rights reserved. This page was last updated: 03/29/2017 9:18 AM