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Conservation News

On the Ground: The Oregon Conservation Strategy at Work

SEPTEMBER 2006

There’s something in the autumn wind that heralds both new beginnings and the renewal of old connections. At ODFW, we are embarking on some innovative projects and reconnecting with a number of our partners as we work to implement the Strategy. This issue of the newsletter details some of them.

Contents
Registry of Conservation Actions Gears Up
Free Workshop for Private Landowners
Grant Funds Dedicated for Strategy Implementation
Meaningful Monitoring
Teaming with Wildlife in Oregon

Registry of Conservation Actions Gears Up

It’s not finished yet and it’s already being talked about nationally. Thanks to Defenders of Wildlife, the Institute for Natural Resources, and a host of partners including ODFW, the Cooperative Registry of Conservation Actions, an Internet-enabled database, will make its debut in Oregon, Washington and Idaho late this year or early next year.

Accessible to anyone via a user-friendly interface, it will allow citizens to see what conservation actions are being conducted in a specific area, what areas are in need of help, how well current projects meet conservation priorities, where partnerships can be created, and how to reduce redundancies and maximize efficiencies.

Designed to track conservation actions on a local and regional scale, it will include a dynamic mapping tool and provide analytic and querying capabilities. It is specifically intended to serve citizens involved in on-the-ground actions—landowners; recreation groups; hunters; fishers; resource agencies and other conservation groups; and policy makers. For more information (pdf)

Contacts: Sara Vickerman, Defenders of Wildlife, svickerman@defenders.org; Moran Rosenthal, moran.rosenthal@oregonstate.edu and Avi Hihinashvili, avi.hihinashvili@oregonstate.edu, Institute for Natural Resources.

Free Workshop for Private Landowners

Why is it important to monitor fish, wildlife and native habitat on your property? How do you get started? What do you do with the information? These are some of the questions that will be answered at a free workshop at the Eugene Hilton on October 5, 2006. For more information, contact Audrey Hatch at ODFW, 503-947-6320, audrey.c.hatch@state.or.us.

Workshop is sponsored by ODFW and The Wildlife Society, Oregon Chapter

Grant Funds Dedicated for Strategy Implementation

The ODFW Landowner Incentive Program (LIP) is dedicated to support Strategy implementation on private lands. Its goal is to protect, enhance and restore habitats for at risk species. Established by Congress in 2002, the program specifically indicates money is to be used for proactive projects that will minimize the potential of future listing under the Endangered Species Act.

While Conservation Strategy implementation projects are just beginning, LIP has been funding projects that contribute to the goals of the Strategy since 2003. An example of the type of project funded is the Gill Family Oak Restoration project in Douglas County. The goal of this project, which jointly involves the McKenzie River Trust, Integrated Resource Management, LIP and the Gill family, is to restore 200 acres of remnant oak woodland and savanna near Oakland, Oregon. Details and photographs of this project

Meaningful Monitoring

Monitoring is an ongoing conversation critical to the success of the Strategy. A statewide Fish and Wildlife Monitoring Team, founded to ensure the dialog is actionable, recommended that ODFW begin development of an Oregon Wildlife Movement Strategy. Under the Strategy umbrella, work is led by the Oregon Department of Transportation and ODFW. The group plans to identify and address barriers to wildlife movement across the state. Expect more information early in the new year.

The full 40-member Fish and Wildlife Monitoring Team meets quarterly, subgroups meet more regularly and a workshop is planned for October 16 and 17 to work on prioritizing species for monitoring activities. Contact Audrey Hatch, ODFW Conservation Strategy Monitoring Coordinator, audrey.c.hatch@state.or.us.     

Teaming with Wildlife in Oregon

Oregon’s Teaming With Wildlife coalition has grown substantially over the last month thanks to the recruitment efforts of team members. Currently we have 99 members and a number of others have expressed interest. The national Teaming With Wildlife Committee meets this winter to discuss coalition efforts and future actions. For more information, contact Martin Nugent at martin.nugent@.state.or.us or visit teaming@fishwildlife.org.

Contact Information
Meg Kenagy
Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
Information and Education
503-947-6021
meg.b.kenagy@state.or.us
www.dfw.state.or.us

 



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09/30/2011 9:03 AM