The Oregon Seal Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife mobile
  
ignore
 » ODFW Home     » Conservation    » State Fish and Wildlife Species
ignore
ignore
ignore
About Us Fishing Hunting Viewing License/Regs Conservation Living With Wildlife Education
ignore
ignore
Elk Head CONSERVATION
Native fish, wildlife and their habitat
ignore

Oregon’s State Fish and Wildlife Species

Beaver
Beaver
Oregon Fish and Wildlife

American Beaver

Oregon’s early economy was built on beaver pelts. During the 1800s, by feeding European and eastern American demand for beaver hats and coats, fur trappers virtually eliminated the species from many landscapes through unregulated trapping. With proper management, however, beaver have become re-established and are now common throughout their range. In 1969, the Legislature recognized the American Beaver by naming it Oregon’s state animal. Beavers enhance habitat for many other fish and wildlife species through their dam-building activities. Beaver ponds provide areas for people to fish, hunt and view wildlife. Beavers have reddish brown to black fur, webbing on their hind feet and a tail that is broad, flat, hairless and scaled. 

American beaver (pdf)

Western Meadowlark

Western Meadowlark
- Photo by Greg Gillson-

Western Meadowlark

The distinctive song of the western meadowlark signaled the arrival of spring to Oregon residents for many years. In 1927, the western meadowlark was selected as our State Bird by Oregon’s school children and confirmed by Governor I. L. Patterson. It appealed to the children because of its bright colors, cheerful song and because it was a common sight in meadows, pastures and grasslands throughout the state. The meadowlark is a striking robin-sized bird with a streaked brown back, bright yellow belly, and distinct v-shaped patch on its chest.

The western meadowlark (pdf)

Spring Chinook

Spring Chinook
- Oregon Fish and Wildlife-

Chinook Salmon

Named the state fish in1961, the chinook salmon is the largest of the salmon species. Chinook salmon are also known as king salmon, tyee salmon, springer and blackmouth. They are prized by anglers for their large size and tremendous fight, and by Native American tribes for cultural and spiritual reasons. Many tribes celebrate "First Salmon Ceremonies" with the first spring chinook harvested each year. Chinook can be recognized by dark-colored or black gums, irregular-shaped black spots on their backs and black spots covering the entire tail.

chinook salmon (pdf)

Oregon Swallowtail

Oregon Swallowtail
- Butterflies of the Pacific Northwest; Mountain Press; Bill Neill-

Oregon Swallowtail

Big and beautiful, the bright yellow and black patterned Oregon swallowtail is a northwest native. Somewhat wary and a strong flier, the butterfly was designated as Oregon's official insect on July 16, 1979 by the Legislature. It was chosen as a state symbol because it is native to the state, has “Oregon” in its common and scientific names and is considered of great aesthetic value.

Oregon swallowtail butterfly (pdf)

ignore
ignore
 


About Us | Fishing | Hunting | Wildlife Viewing | License / Regs | Conservation | Living with Wildlife | ODFW Outdoors

ODFW Home | Driving Directions | Employee Directory | Social Media | Oregon.gov | File Formats

4034 Fairview Industrial Drive SE   ::   Salem, OR 97302   ::    Main Phone (503) 947-6000 or (800) 720-ODFW [6339]

Do you have a question or comment for ODFW? Contact ODFW's Public Service Representative at: odfw.info@state.or.us
Do you want to enter your opinion about a specific issue into the public record? Contact
: odfw.comments@state.or.us





   © ODFW. All rights reserved. This page was last updated: 11/10/2011 9:06 AM