The Oregon Seal Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife mobile
ignore
 » ODFW Home    » Recreation Report
ignore
ignore
ignore
About Us Fishing Hunting Viewing License/Regs Conservation Living With Wildlife Education
ignore
ignore
Fish
Event Calendar Follow ODFW
ODFW WEEKLY RECREATION REPORT
Fishing, Hunting, Wildlife Viewing
ignore
Northwest Zone Map

Weekly Recreation Report: Northwest Zone

September 20, 2017

 Northwest Zone Fishing

Fishing the Nestucca
Fishing in the Nestucca River
-Photo by Kathy Munsel-

Weekend fishing opportunities:

  • Chinook fishing is open in coastal streams and fishing has been fair in streams to good in tidewaters.
  • Cape Mears, Town, Coffenbury, Lost, and Sunset lakes are being stocked with “trophy” rainbow trout this week.

Send us your fishing report

We’d love to hear about your recent fishing experiences. Send us your own fishing report through ODFW Fishing Reports ― the information will be forwarded to the local biologist who may use it to update various ODFW resources such as the Weekly Recreation Report.

NORTH COAST LAKES

Most North Coast lakes have been stocked with trout throughout the spring. Cape Mears, Town, Coffenbury, Lost, and Sunset lakes are being stocked with “trophy” rainbow trout this week. Recent rains and cooler nights are bringing down water temps, and fish should be hungry and willing to bite. Lakes like Coffenbury, Cullaby, Lytle, Cape Meares, Town, and Vernonia offer opportunity for warmwater species, particularly largemouth bass. Warmwater fishing should be good through the fall, but will start to drop off as the weather cools.

MID COAST LAKES

Olalla Reservoir has been stocked with about 100 surplus summer steelhead from the Siletz Falls trap, this season. These fish get fairly active in the lake and offer a unique fishing experience. Once in the lake they are considered “trout” and do not require a Combined Angling Tag. Anglers are reminded, however, that only one trout per day over 20 inches may be retained, and these fish will almost all be in that size range.

Mid Coast lakes been stocked with trout throughout the spring. Trout stocking is over until the fall but there still should be fish around to catch. Water temps are great and fish should be hungry, so go catch them!

ALSEA RIVER: Chinook, trout

Fall Chinook opened Aug. 1 and with the rain early this week fishing is starting to pick up in tidewater. Trout season opened May 22, and there should be some nice cutthroat around. Remember the limit on streams and rivers is two per day over 8-inches.

Anglers are reminded the two-rod validation is only valid while angling in standing water bodies excluding coastal lakes with wild coho seasons. Two rods are prohibited on all coastal rivers, tidewater, estuaries and bays.

KILCHIS RIVER: trout

The Kilchis opened for fall Chinook on Aug. 1 and for catch and release chum salmon fishing on Sept. 16. It’s still a little early for both of these runs on the Kilchis, but with the recent rains there should be a few fish sneaking in. Bobber fishing bait, back-bouncing, back-trolling plugs or divers and bait, or casting spinners can all be effective methods. In addition Chum will hit jigs and flies if presented well.

Trout season opened May 22, and there should be some nice cutthroat around. Sea-run cutthroat should be entering the lower river now, too. Remember, the limit is two per day over 8-inches, and no bait is allowed through Aug. 31.

NEHALEM: trout, Chinook

There are fall Chinook being caught on Nehalem bay but the action has been sporadic thus far. The Nehalem River is open for Chinook, we haven’t heard many reports yet, but with the rain there should be a few fish sneaking into the river. In addition, hatchery coho should be showing up soon. Anglers are reminded that there is NO wild coho retention in the rivers and bays this year, and that two rods are prohibited on all coastal rivers, tidewater, estuaries and bays.

Notice: In water construction activities on the Miami Foley Road bridge at Foss, will be restricting boat access on the Nehalem River. Boaters going downstream from Roy Creek should use caution.

Trout season opened May 22, and there should be some nice cutthroat around. Remember the limit on streams and rivers is two per day over 8-inches.

NESTUCCA RIVER AND THREE RIVERS: steelhead, trout

steelhead
My first steelhead 34" 13.6lbs
-Photo by Uriah Kuehl-

Fall Chinook season is open on Tillamook River and Bay. Fishing on the bay has been moderate with a few fish being caught at the mouth, and up in the estuary. Trolling herring or spinners, bobber fishing bait, or casting spinners are all good techniques. The river just opened above Cloverdale Bridge on the 16th, and we haven’t had many reports yet, but with recent rains there should be a few fish sneaking into the lower River. Bobber fishing bait, Back-bouncing, back-trolling plugs or divers and bait, or casting spinners can all be effective methods. Anglers are reminded that the Nestucca is closed to all salmon angling above First Bridge (near Beaver) Aug. 1 to Dec. 31, and that there is NO wild coho retention in the rivers and bays this year. Also, two rods are prohibited on all coastal rivers, tidewater, estuaries and bays.

Summer steelhead fishing has been moderate to slow, but there are fish throughout the system. September can be a great time to target these fish as cooler nights and recent rains lower water temps, and fish that have been holding get more active. Fish are throughout the system. Target riffles and the top of pools during first and last light, and concentrate on deeper holding pools once the sun is on the water. Fishing stealthy, with light gear, and targeting first and last light is often the key to success with these fish.

Trout season is open, and recent surveys by ODFW found good numbers of cutthroat in the basin, and sea run cutthroat are entering the lower River now, too. Remember the limit on streams and rivers is two per day over 8-inches.

Three Rivers is closed to all angling downstream of the hatchery through Sept. 30.

SALMON RIVER: Chinook, trout

Fall Chinook opened Aug. 1 and with the rain early this week fishing is starting to pick up in the estuary and upriver to the hatchery. Trout season opened May 22, and there should be some nice cutthroat around. Remember the limit on streams and rivers is two per day over 8-inches.

Anglers are reminded the two-rod validation is only valid while angling in standing water bodies excluding coastal lakes with wild coho seasons. Two rods are prohibited on all coastal rivers, tidewater, estuaries and bays.

SILETZ RIVER: steelhead, Chinook, trout

The Siletz River opened for fall Chinook on Aug. 1 and with the rain early this week fishing is starting to pick up in tidewater.

Anglers are reminded the two-rod validation is only valid while angling in standing water bodies excluding coastal lakes with wild coho seasons. Two rods are prohibited on all coastal rivers, tidewater, estuaries and bays.

Trout season opened May 22, and there should be some nice cutthroat around. Remember the limit on streams and rivers is two per day over 8-inches.

SIUSLAW RIVER: Chinook, trout

Fall Chinook opened Aug. 1 and with the rain early this week fishing is starting to pick up in tidewater. Trout season opened May 22, and there should be some nice cutthroat around. Remember the limit on streams and rivers is two per day over 8-inches.

Anglers are reminded the two-rod validation is only valid while angling in standing water bodies excluding coastal lakes with wild coho seasons. Two rods are prohibited on all coastal rivers, tidewater, estuaries and bays.

Fishing Taho Lake
The Day Begins. Fishing the Trask River
- Photo by Tom Armour-

TILLAMOOK BAY: Chinook

Fall Chinook fishing has picked up a bit, and is moderate on Tillamook Bay. There are fish being caught from the jetties through the upper bay, although action has been spotty. Trolling herring in the lower bay and spinners in the upper bay are the go to techniques.

Anglers are reminded that there is NO wild coho retention in the rivers and bays this year, and that two rods are prohibited on all coastal rivers, tidewater, estuaries and bays.

TRASK RIVER: steelhead, trout

Fall Chinook fishing opened on the Trask River Sept. 16. We haven’t had many reports yet, but with the recent rains, there are probably a few fish sneaking in; both Chinook and hatchery coho. Bobber fishing bait, back-bouncing, back-trolling plugs or divers and bait, or casting spinners can all be effective methods.

Anglers are reminded that the dam hole (MP 7 on Trask River Rd up to Blue Ridge Creek) is closed to angling Sept. 1 - Nov. 30, and that 200 feet upstream and 900 feet downstream of Gold Creek at Trask Hatchery (which includes the Hatchery Hole) is closed to angling July 16 – Oct. 15.

WILSON RIVER: Chinook, steelhead, trout

Fall Chinook fishing opened on the Wilson River Sept. 16. With the recent rains, there are probably a few fish sneaking in. Bobber fishing bait, back-bouncing, back-trolling plugs or divers and bait, or casting spinners can all be effective methods. Anglers are reminded the Wilson River is closed to salmon angling Aug. 1 to Dec. 31, upstream of Jordan Creek (River Mile 21.9).

Summer steelhead fishing on the Wilson has been moderate to slow, but there are good numbers of fish throughout the system. Late August and September can be a great time to target these fish as cooler nights lower water temps, and fish that have been holding get more active. Target riffles and the top of pools during first and last light, and concentrate on deeper holding pools once the sun is on the water. Fishing stealthy, with light gear, and targeting first and last light is often the key to success with these fish.

Trout season opened May 22, and there are some cutthroat around, but fishing for them in the Wilson’s clear summer flows can be tough. Remember, the limit on streams and rivers is two per day over 8 inches.

YAQUINA RIVER: Chinook, trout

Chinook is open and with the rain early this week fishing is starting to pick up in tidewater. Trout season opened May 22, and there should be some nice cutthroat around. Remember, the limit on streams and rivers is two per day over 8-inches.

Anglers are reminded the two-rod validation is only valid while angling in standing water bodies excluding coastal lakes with wild coho seasons. Two rods are prohibited on all coastal rivers, tidewater, estuaries and bays.

  Northwest Zone Hunting

OPEN: COUGAR, BLACK BEAR, ARCHERY DEER AND ELK (closes Sept. 24), FOREST GROUSE & QUAIL, BAND-TAILED PIGEON (Sept. 15-23)

Hunting forecasts now available

Biologists from around the state weigh in on what to expect this fall. See the Big Game and Bird Hunting forecasts online.

Hunting and fire danger in Oregon
ODFW does not close hunting seasons due to fire danger. However, hunters may face restrictions due to fires burning on public land and reduced access to private lands during fire season. More info including list of private land closures

Recent rains have greatly reduced fire danger in northwestern Oregon, and industrial fire precaution levels have dropped correspondingly. Consequently, more industrial forest lands have opened up for hunter access. Please check with the landowner’s access policies for the latest news on hunter access.

Cougar are most effectively taken by using predator calls. However, cougar densities are relatively low on the north coast. Successful hunters, remember you must check in cougar (hide and skull) at an ODFW office within 10 days of harvest and bring them in unfrozen. It’s also a good idea to prop their mouths open with a stick after harvest for easier tissue sampling, teeth collection and tagging.
Black Bear
Black Bear, by trail camera
-Photo provided by Greg Robinson-

Fall Black Bear season goes through Dec. 31 on the north coast. Most wild berry crops are starting to diminish or rot with recent rainfall, so apple and other fruit trees in old abandoned homesteads would be worth checking out. Another strategy is to scout seldom-travelled or grown-in roads for fresh sign to key in on areas bears are frequenting. Successful hunters, remember you must check in bear (skull at a minimum) at an ODFW office within 10 days of harvest and bring them in unfrozen. It’s also a good idea to prop their mouths open with a stick after harvest for easier tissue sampling, teeth collection and tagging.

Archery Deer and Elk seasons close Sept. 24. Recent rains have reduced fire danger on private industrial lands and resulted in easing up on hunter access restrictions in place in recent weeks. The breeding period, or rut, should be in full swing and will go on through the end of the season later this month.

Forest grouse and mountain quail season is ongoing through January 31, 2018. Decent numbers of birds have been seen during the late summer period, so prospects should be good. Look for ruffed grouse on cool mid-slope and creek bottom areas. Blue or sooty grouse are generally found higher in elevation on ridge tops. Mountain quail are most frequently spotted near older, brushy clearcuts, especially on west of south-facing slopes.

Band-tailed pigeon season ends Sept. 23. High numbers of these native pigeons have been seen in forested areas of the coast range, especially where cascara trees are abundant.

 Northwest Zone Wildlife Viewing

Pileated Woodpecker

Pileated Woodpecker
- Photo by Greg Gillson-

Early southward migrants have been reported for a number of shorebird species on north coast estuaries and beaches. The very first of breeding shorebirds and waterfowl have been spotted recently migrating south. Green-winged teal, wandering tattlers and dunlins among others have been spotted locally.

TILLAMOOK COUNTY

Bayocean Spit on Tillamook Bay is a popular stopover for migrating shorebirds. Migrating waterfowl will be found out on the bay near the spit. A gravel path is closed to motorized access, but is a good hike to catch glimpses of birds along the bay. The first green winged teal were spotted here last week.

CLATSOP COUNTY

The Astoria Mitigation Bank Wetlands are along the west bank of the Lewis and Clark River on the north side of Alternate HWY 101. The freshwater and tidal wetlands attract many species of migrating ducks and shorebirds. Virginia rail, sora and American bittern are resident species.

Jewell Meadows Wildlife Area

Roosevelt Elk

Jewell Meadows Wildlife Area
-Photo by Rick Swart, ODFW-

Elk viewing has been good at Jewell Meadows Wildlife Area. Best viewing has been in the evenings until dark on warm sunny days. Elk tend to be in the open areas a little longer in the mornings and evenings on cool cloudy days. Most of the meadows have been mowed so elk should be easier to spot. Good places to look are the Fishhawk Tract along Hwy. 202 and the Beneke Tract along the first 1.5 miles of Beneke Creek Road.

The elk breeding season or “rut” should start at the end of August and continue until the first part of October with the peak about mid-September. This is a good time to visit the wildlife area to see breeding activity including bulls bugling and battling for dominance. Tree and violate green swallows can still be seen gliding over fields and resting on fence lines near viewing areas. Band-tailed pigeons have been observed near area bird feeders and frequenting the many cascara trees throughout the wildlife area. Many other song bird species can be seen in and around viewing areas. Check out the new white board at the Kiosk for daily updates on viewing opportunities.

Visitors are reminded that areas posted as Wildlife Refuge are closed to public access. Additionally, posted portions of the Beneke Tract are closed to public entry during any Saddle Mt. unit elk season including Archery season. Closure dates are Aug. 1 through March 15 (see big game regulations for exceptions).

Wildlife Area Parking Permits are required on the Wildlife Area. (Updated 8/22/17)


Zones: Northwest | Southwest | Willamette | Central | Southeast | Northeast | Snake | Columbia | Marine


Facebook Twitter RSS feed YouTube E-mail Sign Up
ignore
   
 


About Us | Fishing | Hunting | Wildlife Viewing | License / Regs | Conservation | Living with Wildlife | ODFW Outdoors

ODFW Home | Driving Directions | Employee Directory | Social Media | Oregon.gov | File Formats | Employee Webmail

4034 Fairview Industrial Drive SE   ::   Salem, OR 97302   ::    Main Phone (503) 947-6000 or (800) 720-ODFW [6339]

Do you have a question or comment for ODFW? Contact ODFW's Public Service Representative at: odfw.info@state.or.us
Share your opinion or comments on a Fish and Wildlife Commission issue at
: odfw.commission@state.or.us





   © ODFW. All rights reserved. This page was last updated: 09/20/2017 11:38 AM