Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
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last updated: 02/20/2014
 
Oregon Species

Oregon Wildlife Species

Sport Fish Species of Oregon

Marine | Shellfish | Salmon | Sturgeon | Trout & Steelhead | Warmwater | Other Migratory Fish


Marine
Huge Halibut
Matt Blume with his “monster” 106-pound halibut
- Oregon Fish and Wildlife-
Flatfish

Flatfishes are unique in that the skull is asymmetrical with both eyes on the same side of the head. Flatfish begin life like symmetrical fish, with an eye on each side of the head. A few days after hatching, one eye begins to migrate and soon both eyes are close together on one side. Flatfish spend the rest of their lives on or near the bottom with the eyed side facing up.

Flatfish species include the Arrowtooth flounder, butter sole, curlfin sole, dover sole, english sole, flathead sole, Pacific halibut, Pacific sanddab, petrale sole, rex sole, rock sole, sand sole and the starry flounder.

Copper Rockfish
Copper Rockfish
-Washington Dept. of Fish & Wildlife -
Rockfish

Rockfish live in shallow, rocky, intertidal waters and feed on a variety of fish and crustaceans and squid.

The dorsal and anal spines of the rock fish are mildly venomous and can cause painful wounds.

Some rockfish species in Oregon, such as canary and yelloweye, are estimated to be at only a fraction of their historical abundance and regulations have been set to protect them.

Pacific Angel Shark
Pacific Angel Shark
-Bill Barss, ODFW -
Sharks

Oregon Sharks include the leopard, Pacific angel, salmon, and soupfin

Some of Oregon's sharks live on the bottom of the ocean partially covered by sand (such as the Pacific angle shark - shown). Others may travel up to 35 miles a day. Pacific angles feed on fish, the leopard on fish and crustaceans.

Sandpaper Skate
Sandpaper Skate
-Bill Barss, ODFW -
Skates

Bottom fish, scates spen most of their time partially burried by mud or sand. The wing of the skate are used to propel this fish through the water. Only these wings are used for food.

Oregon Skates include the big skate, black scate, longnose skate, and sandpaper skate.

Cabezon

Cabezon
- Oregon Fish and Wildlife-

Other Finfish

Other Oregon Finfish include the cabezon, electric ray, jack mackerel, kelp greenling, lingcod, longspine thornyhead, Pacific (Chub) Mackerel, Pacific cod, Pacific grenadier, Pacific herring, Pacific hake, red irish lord, redtail surfperch, rock greenling, sablefish, shortspine thornyhead and wolf eel.

 
Shellfish
Crab

Dungeness Crab
- Photo by Kathy Munsel, ODFW -

Crab

Dungeness crabs are found to some extent in nearly all Oregon estuaries and out to depths of 180 fathoms (1,080 ft) off shore. However, the majority of ocean crabs will be found in 50 fathoms (300 feet) of water or less. Crabs are carnivorous, commonly eating small shrimps, clams, smaller crabs, worms, snails, fish, as well as most any other animal flesh. Adult and juvenile crabs are preyed upon by fishes and octopus.

Bay Clams
Bay Clams
-Oregon Fish and Wildlife-
Clams

Bay Clams: Oregon estuaries are rich with many species of clams, although only a few of these species are commonly harvested. Gaper, butter, cockle, littleneck, and softshell are primarily harvested due to their abundance, size, and taste. A wide variety of other bivalve species are found in Oregon estuaries, but not commonly harvested due either to their scarcity or lack of palatability.

Razor Clams: Razor clams are found throughout Oregon’s ocean beaches. Clatsop beaches (Columbia River to Seaside) have the most stable populations, 95 percent of Oregon's razor clam digging occurs here. Other area’s such as, Agate Beach, Waldport Beach, Whiskey Run, Myers Creek, and other beaches along the coast also have razor clam populations, but tend to be less available.


Grant's Getaways, Crabbing & Clamming Video
| Other Invertebrates


Salmon

About Oregon Salmon

There are five species of salmon found in the Pacific Northwest, of which three are common to Oregon: the chinook or king, the coho or silver, and the chum or dog salmon.  Neither sockeye nor pink salmon return to Oregon streams in significant numbers, although a major commercial offshore harvest of pinks occurs during alternate years as they spawn.  Sockeyes migrate by the thousands up the Columbia each summer but all spawn in Washington waters.  Landlocked versions of sockeye, called kokanee, thrive in many Oregon mountain lakes.  With minor differences, the three Oregon inhabitants share similar life and reproductive cycles, which divide neatly into three distinct periods, freshwater, saltwater and spawning phases.

Life Cycle of Salmon Video

Atlantic Salmon

The Atlantic Salmon is a large fish weighing up to 80 pounds, but averaging about 10 pounds.  The landlocked form is smaller than the sea-run type, averaging from 3 to 5 pounds in weight.

Coloration varies, but generally it is brownish along the back with silvery sides and belly.  Black spots appear along the back, many of them x-shaped.  The tail is deeply forked.

Spawning occurs in the fall.  Landlocked salmon enter the tributary streams for the spawning act, returning to the lake when spawning is completed.  Little success has been obtained from the many attempts to establish the sea-run Atlantic salmon in streams tributary to the Pacific.  The landlocked form is adaptable to lakes where suitable environmental conditions exist, but little spawning has been observed in Oregon.

In Oregon, Atlantic salmon have been stocked in several Cascade lakes and managed as trout.  Currently, Hosmer Lake is the only location where these fish are found.

Chinook (King, Blackmouth) Salmon

Chinook Salmon
Big Hen Chinook Salmon - Lake Creek
-Oregon Fish and Wildlife-

The chinook salmon rears in the Pacific Ocean for most of its life and spawns in freshwater streams. The majority of mature chinook salmon enter Oregon coastal rivers from about April through December. Spring chinook begin entering the Columbia River in February. Entry into most Oregon rivers reaches a low point in summer. Different populations of chinook salmon in a basin can be distinguished by the season of the year during which they return to fresh water since fish with different run timings tend to spawn in different parts of the basin and thus maintain some reproductive isolation. Such populations in Oregon rivers are usually called either spring or fall chinook, although several populations could legitimately be described as summer or winter chinook. Spawning generally occurs from August to early November for spring chinook and from October to early March for fall chinook. All adults die within two weeks after spawning.

Chum (Dog) Salmon

The chum salmon rears in the Pacific and Arctic oceans and spawns in freshwater streams. Most of the chum salmon life span is spent in a marine environment. Adults typically enter spawning streams ripe, promptly spawn, and die within two weeks of arrival. Most spawning runs are over a short distance. Adults are strong swimmers, but poor jumpers and are restricted to spawning areas below barriers, including minor barriers that are easily passed by other anadromous species. Juveniles are intolerant of prolonged exposure to fresh water and migrate to estuarine waters promptly after emergence. Chum salmon mature at 2 to 6 years of age and may reach sizes over 40 pounds.

Coho (Silver) Salmon

Coho Salmon
Coho Salmon
-U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service-

The coho salmon rears for part of its life in the Pacific Ocean and spawns in freshwater streams. Mature fish migrate into fresh water in the fall, typically spawning from November through February. They may spend several weeks to several months in fresh water before spawning, depending on the distance they migrate to reach their spawning grounds. All adults die within two weeks after spawning. Juveniles normally spend one summer and one winter in fresh water, although they may remain for one or two extra years in the coldest rivers in their range. They migrate to the ocean in the spring, generally one year after emergence, as silvery smolts about four to five inches long. Initial ocean migration off Oregon appears to be to the north of their natal streams, but as they mature during their second summer in the ocean they are found predominantly off the coasts of California and Oregon to the south of their natal streams. Maturing coho from Oregon are rarely caught north of the U.S. border. Most adults mature at 3 years of age, but some males mature as 2--old "jacks" or "precocious males." Coho adults rarely exceed 15 pounds.

Kokanee and Sockeye

kokanee
Kokanee

This species requires a lake for part of it's life cycle. Spawning may occur along lake shorelines or in stream gravels, but fry always migrate to lake environments soon after emergence and occupy this habitat during their stay in fresh water.

Both kokanee and sockeye were historically present in two basins in Oregon -- the Grande Ronde River in the Snake River Basin and the Deschutes River in the lower Columbia River Basin. Sockeye are extinct in the Grande Ronde and persist only at extremely low levels in the Deschutes due to the construction of artificial barriers. Kokanee are still present in both basins.

 
Sturgeon
sturgeon
White Sturgeon
- Oregon Fish and Wildlife -

White Sturgeon: prehistoric bottom-feeding sturgeon are alive and well in many Oregon coastal rivers as well as in the Columbia and Snake rivers.  Sturgeon may live well over 100 years and their obviously slow growth rate has limited our knowledge about the fish’s life cycle.  It doesn’t help that the sturgeon’s migratory movement is so inconsistent.

They are primarily fresh water fish but will occasionally undertake extensive ocean travels.  These trips may or may not have something to do with spawning, but are probably not critical since sturgeon without access to the sea breed very successfully.

Sturgeon do not mature and spawn until age 11 or later, but thereafter spawn annually in May or June.  A mature female will usually be six feet long or more.  The older and longer she gets, the more eggs she produces.  A 50 year old female may deposit four million eggs.

A second sturgeon species, the green sturgeon, also exists along Oregon’s coast.   It is more commonly found in lower rivers, bays and estuaries and is usually much smaller than its cousin.  The poor taste of its flesh has kept it from becoming as popular a game fish as white sturgeon.

Grant's Getaways, Dinosour of a Fish Video

 

Trout & Steelhead

Brook Trout

Brook Trout
Brook Trout
-U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service-

Originally from the eastern seaboard, the brook trout has been successfully introduced in many Oregon waters especially in the cold, mountainous streams and lake where other species are unable to do well.  Many barren lakes have been stock with brook trout, providing angling recreation where none was previously available.

One of the most colorful of the chars, the brook trout is dark green above, with worm-like markings on the back and dorsal fin.  Cream and red spots appear on the sides,  with the red spots bordered with blue.  The lower fins are reddish, the leading edges bordered with a white and black stripe.  Generally, the weights run up to three pounds, but larger fish are frequently taken.

Spawning occurs in the fall, usually in spring-fed tributaries or on gravel bars in the lakes.  The female may deposit from 500 to 2,500 eggs.

Brook trout thrive in cold water below 65 degrees.  They prefer spring-fed lakes and streams.  IN some areas, especially if not properly harvested, brook trout may overpopulate a lake and become stunted from lack of food and crowded conditions

Brown Trout

Brook Trout
Brown Trout Caught in Lake County
-Photo by Roger Smith, ODFW-

A native of Europe, the brown has been successfully introduced into almost every section of the United States.  In Oregon, it has become well established in suitable environment.  The Deschutes River, East Lake, Suttle Lake and Wickiup Reservoir are noted for producing large browns, many reaching eight pounds or more.

The coloration tends to be golden-brownish with dark brown or black spots on the body, and on the dorsal and adipose fins.  Usually few or no spots appear on the tail fin.  Many body spots, especially those below the lateral line, are edged with pink, red, or orange, forming rings or halos.  Breeding males develop strong teeth and a hooked snout.

Spawning occurs from October to January.  Although brown trout can adapt themselves to sluggish streams and warmer temperatures than other trout, cold, spring-fed tributary streams with stable water conditions are required for proper spawning success.

The brown is known as the wariest of trout and the most difficult to catch.

Bull Trout

Bull Trout
Bull Trout
-Washington Dept. of Fish & Wildlife -

Bull trout are fierce predators on other fish and can reach sizes of 20 pounds in some Oregon rivers.  They need cold clean water to survive and are typically found in the headwaters of Oregon rivers such as the Willamette, Deschutes, Hood, John Day, Umatilla, Grande Ronde, and Klamath.  Bull trout are uncommon in most of these rivers and are listed as ‘threatened’ under the Endangered Species Act.  In some Oregon rivers it is illegal for anglers to fish for bull trout, so please check your regulations.

Bull trout can be identified as greenish to brown on their back and sides, few or no spots on their fins, with cream or yellowish spots on their sides.  Some spots along the side may be deep orange to red.  The leading edges of their ventral fins are white.  Bull trout are considered a char and are closely related to dolly varden, eastern brook trout, and lake trout.

In Oregon, bull trout have a variety of life history strategies that include highly migratory and non migratory populations.  Spawning occurs in the Fall when water temperatures drop below 50F.  Usually, juvenile bull trout feed on insects until they are large enough to transition their diet to fish.  Adult bull trout primarily feed on fish.

Cutthroat Trout (Onchorynchus clarki)

Cutthroat Trout
Cutthroat Trout
-U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service-

Second only to the rainbow in angling importance is the cutthroat trout.  As with the rainbow, several races of cutthroats occur in Oregon, but again differences are primarily in degree of color.  A sea-run form, commonly called blueback or harvest trout, inhabits coastal streams, spending most of its life in the ocean or brackish bays and lagoons.  Cutthroat do not confine themselves strictly to salt water, but may run in and out of streams in search of food.  At maturity they ascend the rivers to spawn.  The mountain or native race, more highly colored than its seagoing brothers, confines its life to inland streams and lakes.  The black-spotted cutthroat is found well distributed throughout the Wallowa Mountains.

The name “cutthroat” is derived from the two red slash marks or streaks on the underside of the lower jaw.  On some fish this mark may be indistinct of the lower jaw.  On some fish this mark may be indistinct or lacking, especially on fresh sea-run fish.  These red marks and teeth on the back of the tongue distinguish the cutthroat from the rainbow.  In addition, the lip bone on the upper jaw of the cutthroat extends well beyond the hind margin of the eye.  Coloration is generally dark green above, olive sides and silvery below.  The color tends to be bluish on sea-run fish.  Numerous black spots appear on the head, back and sides, and on the dorsal, adipose and caudal fins.  Weights will run up to three pounds with large fish occasionally taken.

Spawning usually takes place in the headwaters during the early spring months.  After spawning is completed, the spent fish drop back into lakes, larger streams or ocean bays.

Lake Trout

Lake Trout
Fisherman with Lake Trout
-U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service-

Largest of the chars, lake trout reach weights of 20 pounds over much of their range.  A commercially take lake trout was recorded at 80 pounds.

Originally from Canada and the Great Lakes region, lake trout have been introduced into suitable Oregon waters.

The lake trout needs deep cold water with plenty of oxygen and proper spawning areas.  It also must have an abundance of forage fishes.  Spawning occurs in the fall with the males first to appear on rocky shoal or ledge areas to prepare the nests.  The female then moves up from deep water and deposits her eggs in the crevices among the rocks.  No attempt is made to cover the eggs.  Food of the young consists of small crustaceans, while the adults feed almost exclusively on other fishes.

This trout is gray to dark grayish-green in color with light spots over much of its body.  The body is slender with a long head.  The tail is deeply forked.

Except for short periods when in the shallows, lake trout must be angled for by trolling at great depths.

Rainbow Trout

rainbow trout
Rainbow Trout
- Photo by Kathy Munsel , ODFW-
Redband Trout
Redband Trout
-Washington Dept. of Fish & Wildlife -

Best known and the most widely distributed trout in Oregon is the rainbow.  Many races of rainbow exist, but differences are minor consisting primarily of variations in color and shape.  Most abundant races in Oregon are the steelhead rainbow and resident rainbow.  Several million of these fish are produced annually in hatcheries.

The color of all trout varies with environment.  In general, the rainbow is bluish-green on the back, silvery on the sides and belly.  A generous sprinkling of black spots appear along the back, and on the dorsal, adipose and caudal fins.  A pinkish band usually extends along the sides.  Native rainbows have a darker band and are known as "Redband Trout," found primarily in the eastern areas of the state. Rainbows have short heads; the lip bone on the upper jaw seldom extending beyond the hind margin of the eye.  They lack teeth on the back of the tongue.  Lengths of 3 feet 9 inches and weights of 42 pounds have been recorded.

Rainbow usually spawn during the early spring months, although fall spawners are used in most hatcheries.  The number of eggs produced varies with the size of the fish.  A 10 to 12-inch rainbow produces from 800 to 1,000 eggs, while a fish over 24 inches may produce from 5,000 to 9,000 eggs.

Steelhead

steelhead trout
North Coast Steelhead
- Oregon Fish and Wildlife-

The steelhead or sea-run rainbow trout is the largest race of rainbow in Oregon.  Most steelhead migrate to the ocean during their first or second year, returning one to three years later when mature to spawn.

Mountain Whitefish

The Oregon or Rocky Mountain whitefish is closely related to the trout and chars and is often included in this family.   Although inhabiting many Oregon streams and lakes, it thrives best in clear, cold water.

 Trout-like in appearance, the body is silvery in color with a bronze or darkish back.  The mouth is silvery in color with a bronze or darkish back.  The mouth is small with weak teeth.  Lengths run to 20 inches.  Whitefish are often erroneously called grayling by many anglers.

Many sportsmen look with disfavor on the whitefish and often throw it away as undesirable.  However, the flesh of the whitefish is of good quality, being firm, palatable and tasty and the bony structure is the same as that of trout.

 
Warmwater Fish

Bluegill

Bluegill
Bluegill
-U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service-

Bluegills prosper in clear, clean ponds, lakes and backwaters of slow streams having abundant vegetation. They feed on both plant and animal life, but primarily on small crustaceans, insects, snails and other invertebrates.

Black Crappie

Copper Rockfish
Black Crappie
-U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service-

Black crappie do best in clear waters of medium-sized lakes, reservoirs and large slow moving streams. They are less tolerant of flowing and muddy water than white crappie and more associated with aquatic vegetation.

Black crappie begin life feeding primarily on zooplankton. As they grow they begin taking increasingly larger percentages of insects, other larger invertebrates and small fish.

Catfish

Channel Catfish
Channel Catfish
-U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service-

Bullheads are found on the bottom in the shallows of mud-bottomed ponds, lakes, reservoirs and backwaters of rivers. The brown species is common throughout the state. The yellow bullhead is found mainly in the Willamette basin, while the black bullhead is primarily in reservoirs and streams tributary to the Snake River. Bullheads feed on almost any type of plant or animal material. Insect larvae and mollusks comprise much of the diet.

Channel catfish in western Oregon are limited to the Columbia River, lower Willamette River, and a few ponds in the Willamette Valley. They are much more abundant in eastern Oregon, primarily in the Columbia and Snake rivers and their impoundments, Owyhee Reservoir, the Owyhee River, and the John Day River.  When given the choice, channel catfish prefer clear lakes and streams, but they can tolerate moderately muddy water if food is abundant. Channel catfish are not particular about what they eat. Included in their diet are fish and frogs, either alive or dead, insects, plant material, crayfish, worms, or snails.

Green Sunfish

Green sunfish are found in a variety of habitats, from slow streams to shallow lakes or ponds. They are more frequently associated with smallmouth bass than the other sunfish, since they are better adapted to stream life. However, they can also survive in waters too small for most other sunfish. Green sunfish are often found around weed beds because of cover and abundance of food. They feed primarily on aquatic insects.

Hybrid Bass

Hybrid bass were originally stocked in Tenmile Lakes on the south coast and in Ana Reservoir in Lake County. They have since been introduced into Thompson Reservoir, also in Lake County. The only established population is in Ana Reservoir. Juvenile hybrid bass spend their first year near shore where they feed on zooplankton and insect larvae. However, by age 1 most have moved offshore to open water and switched almost totally to a fish diet. Because of their size and fish diet, hybrid bass can be effective at controlling populations of forage fish, such as the tui chub in Ana Reservoir. They do not reproduce so their continued presence depends on periodic stocking.

 

Large-mouth Bass

Large-mouth Bass
Large-mouth Bass
-U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service-

Large-mouth Bass preferred habitats are shallow ponds and lakes, or the backwater sloughs of rivers where aquatic plants or submerged logs and brush provide abundant cover. Largemouth bass begin life feeding on zooplankton (tiny crustaceans), but soon switch to insects, and then to fish and crayfish.

Pumpkinseed Sunfish

Large-mouth Bass
Pumpkinseed Sunfish
-U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service-

Pumpkinseeds are found in the same habitats and often in association with bluegills. Adults often congregate beneath old deadheads and trees that have fallen into the water. Food habits are also similar to bluegill. They consume large numbers of snails by browsing on the stalks of aquatic vegetation.

Readear Sunfish

In Oregon, redear sunfish are found only in a few ponds in the Willamette Valley and the central part of the state. In their native range, redear sunfish prefer warm, large lakes and reservoirs and bayous with vegetated shallow areas and clear water. They feed primarily on the bottom and seldom take surface insects. The diet consists mostly of zooplankton, insect larvae, snails, and other invertebrates. In the southeastern U.S., they are commonly called “shellcrackers” because of their fondness for snails. Redear sunfish were introduced in Oregon because they grow rapidly and are not as prone to overpopulate and stunt as the other sunfish.

Sacramento Perch

Sacramento perch prefer sloughs and slow-flowing streams. Compared with the introduced sunfishes, this species is difficult to catch. However for edibility, it ranks among the best.

Small-mouth Bass

Small-mouth Bass
Small-mouth Bass
-U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service-

Smallmouth bass are adapted to flowing waters and do well in warm streams with deep holes and rocky ledges. They also prefer lakes and reservoirs with rocky shorelines and limited vegetation. Adult smallmouth feed mostly on fish and crayfish.

Walleye

Walleye are found in the Columbia, Willamette, and Snake rivers and in Phillips Reservoir in Baker County. In the Willamette River, the walleye fishery is limited to the section downstream from Willamette Falls at Oregon City, although a few have been documented as far upstream as Dexter Dam. Walleye prefer large, clean and cold or moderately warm lakes and rivers with sand or gravel bottoms. Large walleyes live almost exclusively on fish when they are available, but they will consume crayfish, frogs, snails and other items. Young fish feed on zooplankton, soon shifting to a variety of vertebrates and invertebrates.

Warmouth

In Oregon, warmouth are present in a few coastal lakes and widely distributed in the Columbia basin, but are not commonly caught by anglers. However, they are unusually abundant in Tahkenitch Lake on the central coast.  Warmouth are almost always found in shallow, slow moving or still water where the bottom is soft and there is abundant aquatic vegetation and cover. Young feed on plankton and insects, while adults feed on insects, crayfish and fish.

White Crappie

White crappie do best in larger lakes and reservoirs and are more tolerant of turbidity and less dependent on aquatic vegetation than black crappie. They congregate around pilings, sunken logs, underwater brush, weed beds and rocks.

White crappie begin life feeding primarily on zooplankton. As they grow they begin taking increasingly larger percentages of insects, other larger invertebrates and small fish.

Yellow Perch

Yellow Perch
Yellow Perch
-Wikipedia -

Yellow perch prefer lakes, reservoirs and slower moving streams that have cool, clean water and ample vegetation. Perch bite readily and are therefore popular with young and novice anglers.

Other Migratory Fish

American Shad

Shad
Shad
-U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service-

Shad are a transplanted eastern fish which first arrived on the West Coast when a small shipment of shad fry was brought by train to California in 1871 and released into the Sacramento River.  With the help of a few more releases, and the shad’s own urge to migrate and multiply, these fish now extend from northern Mexico to Alaska.

Shad are well distributed along the Oregon coast, with major runs entering the Coos, Umpqua and Siuslaw rivers each spring.  The Columbia River shad run is the Northwest’s largest, with an annual run of two million or more fish and well established commercial fishery.

Upon arrival in fresh water, female or roe shad travel upstream to spawning grounds where their free-floating eggs will be fertilized by later-arriving male, or buck shad in a spawning frenzy.  Eggs hatch in eight days and fry spend four to five years in salt water before returning to spawn.  Shad often survive to spawn twice or more.

Pacific Lamprey

The lamprey is an eel-like parasite with cylindrical body and circular mouth.  A lamprey’s mouth is fringed with suction discs and teeth used to puncture the flesh of host fish.  The lamprey sucks blood and fluids from the host with the help of a chemical that keeps the fish blood thin and flowing – which is injected through the parasite’s mouth.

Lamprey are a popular food source for some people and support a small commercial fishery on the Willamette River at the Oregon City Falls.

Smelt

Five representatives of the smelt family return to the Oregon coast to spawn. All are small, silvery, almost translucent fish. Most move short distances upcoastal rivers to spawning on gravelly ocean beaches. Arrival of the surf smelt is a time of bounty and fun, as whole families converge on the beach with a A-frame nets and dip nets to collect the makings of a wonderful meal.

Millions of eulachon or Pacific smelt make their spawning run into the Columbia River each year during late winter, making infrequent side trips into tributaries like the Sandy and the Willamette. A healthy commercial fishery exists on the Columbia; the bulk of sales is to fur farms, as food for animals.

Eulachon are very oily fish and once supported a major market among native Americans who used their oil for lanterns.

Striped Bass

Striped Bass
Striped Bass
-Wikipedia -

Striped bass are another transplant introduced on the West Coast in 1878 when 132 fry were released in San Francisco Bay. Additional releases and the fish’s migratory urge brought “stripers” to Oregon’s Coos River system by the late 1800’s and in lesser numbers to the Umpqua and some rivers farther north.

Striped bass, like sturgeon, spend most of their time in fresh water, with occasional and unpredictable trips to the sea.

Mature females release up to several million eggs apiece, which are fertilized immediately by at least one male. If conditions are good, eggs will float freely in the water for two or three weeks before hatching. Hatchlings live off the remaining yolk sac for another week or so before beginning their adult lifestyle. Both sexes survive to spawn again.

 


Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
4034 Fairview Industrial Dr. S.E.   ::   Salem, OR 97302   ::    Main Phone (503) 947-6000 or (800) 720-ODFW   ::   www.dfw.state.or.us

Questions?
Contact odfw.web@state.or.us