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The Ocean Salmon Management Program (Commercial Troll Salmon and Ocean Recreational Salmon Fisheries)

Recent Management Actions and Updates:

 

August 9, 2018 - ACTION NOTICE - Commercial Troll Salmon: NOAA Fisheries in consultation with Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, representatives from the commercial troll fishery, and the Pacific Fishery Management Council, has taken in-season action with respect to the commercial troll salmon fishery from Humbug Mt. to the OR/CA Border:

ACTION TAKEN:

  • The landing week (Thurs-Wed) landing and possession limit is increased from 50 Chinook to 80 Chinook effective on August 13.

RATIONALE: During the first 5 days of open trolling in the August quota fishery, a total of 212 Chinook were landed out of the adjusted quota of 1,430 (15%). The weekly limits are used as a tool to help insure that landings stay within the overall quota. Due to the lower number of participating vessels and very limited open days in August, the increase to the landing limit should allow a better opportunity for the troll fishery to access the remaining quota.

Participating vessels are reminded of the mandatory reporting of landings within one hour of delivery or prior to transport away from the port of landing. Reports may be made by phone to (541)867-0300 ext. 252 or by email to kmzor.trollreport@state.or.us. Report should include the vessel name and documentation number, the number of salmon being by species, the port of landing, the name of the fish buyer to whom the fish are being sold, and the estimated time of delivery.

 

8/8/18 ACTION NOTICE #1 of 2- Recreational Ocean Salmon: NOAA Fisheries in consultation with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, representatives from the recreational and the commercial ocean troll salmon fisheries, and the Pacific Fishery Management Council, has taken in-season action with respect to the recreational salmon fishery in the area from Leadbetter Point to Cape Falcon.

ACTIONS TAKEN:

  • Within the Columbia River Ocean Salmon Management Area (Leadbetter Point, Washington to Cape Falcon, Oregon), recreational ocean salmon fishing closes effective 11:59 PM on Sunday, August 12, 2018.
  • Transfer of 2,400 Coho from the US Canada Border to Cape Falcon commercial troll salmon fishery to the recreational fishery in the Columbia River Area in exchange for any Chinook remaining from the recreational guideline in this area being transferred to the commercial troll fishery.
  • Transfer of 600 Coho from the recreational ocean fishery in the Westport Area to the recreational fishery in the Columbia River Ocean Area.

RATIONALE AND NOTES: The marked Coho Salmon quota in this area is expected to be met by the end of the day on Sunday, August 12. Through Sunday, August 5, an estimated 14,086 Coho Salmon had been landed out of the quota of 21,000 Coho leaving only 6,914 Coho available for harvest. The most recent week of fishing had total landings of 7,639 Coho or 36% of the quota in one week. Effort and catches have been accelerating in the area, and the added transfers from the commercial troll and Westport recreational fisheries are expected to keep the fishery from exceeding the quota prior to the scheduled close on August 12. Any coho that may remain from the Columbia River Ocean Area quota will be transferred back to the Westport area recreational and to the commercial troll coho quotas on the same rate that they were provided to the Columbia River Area recreational fishery.

 

5/30/18 ACTION NOTICE #2 of 2 - Commercial Troll Salmon – Incidental Pacific Halibut: NOAA Fisheries in consultation with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, representatives from the commercial troll fishery, and the Pacific Fishery Management Council, has taken in-season action with respect to retention of Pacific Halibut in the commercial troll salmon fishery:

ACTION TAKEN:

  • Retention of Pacific Halibut in the commercial ocean troll salmon fishery closes effective at 11:59PM on Wednesday, August 8, 2018. Commercial salmon troll vessels in possession of Pacific Halibut must land and deliver their catch no later than 11:59PM on Thursday, August 9, 2018.

RATIONALE: Through August 7, only an estimated 736 lbs. remain on the incidental troll quota of Pacific Halibut. This equates to likely less than 36 individual fish. Harvest estimates will be reviewed in the next week or two to see if enough halibut poundage may remain to allow for any additional small opening.

 

8/3/2018 INFORMATION - RECREATIONAL SELECTIVE COHO FISHERY:

Hatchery mark-selective (fin-clipped hatchery) coho fisheries have been an effective tool to allow for longer fishing seasons and larger quotas than could be obtained in a fishery where non-clipped coho are allowed in the bag limit. Mark-selective fishing seasons are considered in those areas where hatchery salmon are expected to make up a large portion of the catch, where the majority of the hatchery salmon are fin-clipped, and where conservation or fishery management concerns limit non-selective seasons to very short durations. In 2018, all fishing impacts for coho were limited to no more than 18% of Lower Columbia River coho (LCN) and 15% of the Oregon Coastal Natural coho (OCN) populations. Other stocks of coho off the Washington Coast were also of concern and were an added limitation on seasons. Within the developed seasons it was forecast that 16.2% of the LCN coho will be impacted with 3.8% coming from the Cape Falcon to Humbug Mt. sport seasons. For OCN coho, overall impacts were forecast at 12.9% with 7.5% coming from the Cape Falcon to Humbug Mt. sport seasons.

The most common concern expressed by anglers about selective fisheries is that they are having to release too many fish to catch hatchery fish for retention, and that too many released fish will not survive. Expected mortality of coho released during the fishery is included in the analysis when the ocean salmon seasons are developed in the spring. However, while some released wild coho will die, in a non-selective fishery 100% of wild coho retained will die and are counted against allowable limits. However, in a mark-selective coho fishery only 15% of the wild coho that are caught and released will count against the allowable impact. Based on the estimated post-release mortality rates, annual quotas for a mark-selective coho fishery in Oregon are expected to be at least three to four times greater than if anglers were allowed to retain all coho. This results in a higher overall harvest of coho and longer coho seasons than can be attained with non-selective coho seasons.

It is true that not all hatchery coho are fin-clipped. Currently, both ODFW and WDFW fin clip nearly 100% of their hatchery coho production. However there are a number of hatchery releases – such as those used in upper basin reintroduction and research efforts – that are not fin clipped. Hatchery coho for the 2018 fishing season were released from hatcheries in 2017. A total of 17 million hatchery coho were released from the Columbia Basin in 2017. Of that total, 15 million, or 89%, were marked with an adipose fin-clip. In addition to hatchery clipping rates, the rate at which anglers will encounter unmarked coho is affected by the relative abundance of wild coho from a variety of areas. This rate will vary depending on when and where anglers are fishing. Highest fin-clipped rates will be encountered prior to mid-August, and higher rates are more typically observed on the North and Central Oregon Coast than on the South Oregon Coast. This is because the majority of hatchery coho in the ocean off Oregon come from releases in the Columbia River basin. Those fish begin to return to the Columbia in August, and tend to be in greater abundance closer to the Columbia.

For example, using a rough breakdown of the preseason expectations from this season (using 50% fin-clipped encounter rate, 89% of hatchery coho being clipped, and 15% hook and release mortality rate) a boat catching 100 coho season during the season could expect the following: 50 fin-clipped hatchery coho that would be kept, 6 non fin-clipped hatchery coho released, and 44 wild coho released. Of the 44 released wild coho, the expectation is that about 7 would not survive (44 x 0.15 = 6.6). For the same 100 hooked coho catch if this was a non-selective fishery, the retained catch would consist of the same mix of fish, but all of the wild fish would now be dead and count against the limitations. So for that same boat to stay with the same number of impacted wild coho as in the selective fishery, their catch in a non-selective season would decline from the 50 retained fin-clipped hatchery coho to roughly 15 retained coho (8 fin-clipped hatchery coho, 1 non-clipped hatchery coho, and 6 wild coho).

This all means that in order to stay within the allowed impacts on the critical populations of coho, the quotas in a non-selective quota are dramatically lower than in a hatchery mark selective season. A smaller quota also means a much shorter season. When the public has been presented the option of a larger selective quota vs. a much smaller non-selective coho quota, they have overwhelmingly chosen the selective fishery option. This year, the choice for the Cape Falcon to Humbug Mt. summer season would have been between a selective season quota of 35,000 fin-clipped coho from late June through early September with an additional non-selective season in September of 3,500 coho; and a purely non-selective quota that would have been about 10,000 coho for the same level of impacts to the limitations. It is very likely that the season would have lasted less than 3 weeks as opposed to the 11-12 weeks of coho fishing that are anticipated open under the current season structure.

Our port sampling so far this season indicates that the ratio of non-clipped coho is higher than was forecast. However, it’s important to remember that many factors affect the mark rate of fish encountered. These include better wild coho production than forecast, lower hatchery coho survival than forecast, or abnormal ocean distribution of the coho populations off of Oregon. Efforts to develop inseason updates of salmon abundances in the ocean based on fishery performance have been hindered by very high uncertainty, and as of today, no reliable method has been found. As a result, fishery managers are unable to determine which of those possibilities is actually occurring until well after fish return to spawn. In the meantime, we hope anglers will work hard to insure that as many of the coho they have to release do survive.

Some tips for improving survival of released salmon include:

  • If you seem to be encountering a large number of unmarked fish and few clipped fish, try moving to a different fishing location.
  • Check for a fin clip before using a landing net. If you aren’t certain, try to check again while the fish is in the net, but before taking it out of the water.
  • Avoid using more than one hook on a line. Double hook mooching rigs can make releasing a salmon difficult, and the second hook often ends up creating additional damage to the fish.
  • Use a de-hooking tool to release fish without removing them from the water. This can be a dowel with a large cup hook on the end or a gaff hook where the bend of the fish hook is caught by the bend of the cup hook or gaff hook and pulled up while the line is being held down in the opposite hand.
  • If the hook is deep inside the mouth or throat, cut the line close to the mouth.
  • If you inadvertently net a salmon that must be released, try to get the fish back in the water immediately with as little handling as possible.

 

8/2/2018 ACTION NOTICE: NOAA Fisheries in consultation with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, California Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, and the Pacific Fishery Management Council, has taken in-season action in the commercial troll salmon fishery in the area from Humbug Mt. to the Oregon/California Border.

ACTION TAKEN: The August Chinook salmon quota for the area from Humbug Mt. to the OR/CA Border is increased by 930 Chinook to a revised quota of 1,430 Chinook.

RATIONALE: The adjusted July quota of 1,975 Chinook was not met during the open days in July. Estimated July landings totaled 1,397 Chinook leaving 578 Chinook on the quota. When the remaining 578 Chinook from the July quota were rolled forward to August on an impact neutral basis, it resulted in a net increase in the transferred quota at a rate of 1.6 August equivalents for each July fish being transferred, and a net increase of 930 Chinook in the August quota. The August season will open as scheduled with 50 Chinook per landing week (Thursday through Wednesday) per vessel for the open periods of August 3-7, August 13-17, and August 25-29 with a revised quota of 1,430 Chinook.

Participating vessels are reminded of the mandatory reporting of landings within one hour of delivery or prior to transport away from the port of landing. Reports may be made by phone to (541)867-0300 ext. 252 or by email to kmzor.trollreport@state.or.us. Report should include the vessel name and documentation number, the number of salmon being by species, the port of landing, the name of the fish buyer to whom the fish are being sold, and the estimated time of delivery.

 

7/24/18 ACTION NOTICE #2 - Commercial Troll Salmon: NOAA Fisheries in consultation with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, representatives from the commercial troll fishery, and the Pacific Fishery Management Council, has taken in-season actions with respect to ocean troll fishery from the US/Canada Border to Cape Falcon, Oregon.

ACTIONS TAKEN:

  • The landing week Chinook Salmon landing and possession limits in the areas from the US/Canada Border to the Queets River, and from Leadbetter Pt. to Cape Falcon were increased from 50 to 75 Chinook. This action will take effect at 00:01 on Thursday, July 26.
  • A transfer of 1,000 Coho Salmon from the troll fishery to the recreational fishery in the Neah Bay area was made in order to keep the recreational fishery open for 1-2 more weeks. Once the recreational season in that area closes any Chinook remaining on the quota in that area will transfer to the commercial troll salmon fishery on an impact neutral basis.

RATIONALE: In both the area N. of the Queets and the Columbia River area (Leadbetter Pt. to Cape Falcon) the risk of exceeding the allowed subarea caps on harvest has diminished greatly. By increasing the landing week limits in these areas, the troll fishery will have a more appropriate opportunity to reach harvest goals for the season while staying below the expectations of impacts on critical stocks.

The recreational season in the Neah Bay area had already reached 74% of their season quota through July 22 nd with 23% being taken in the most recent week. In order to keep the recreational fishery open for at least this week, more coho were needed. A trade with the commercial troll fishery was negotiated to allow the recreational fishery to have a more orderly end to their season.

 

7/24/18 ACTION NOTICE #1 - Commercial Troll Salmon: NOAA Fisheries in consultation with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, representatives from the commercial troll fishery, and the Pacific Fishery Management Council, has taken in-season actions with respect to the retention of Pacific Halibut in the ocean troll fishery from the US/Canada Border to the US/Mexico Border.

ACTION TAKEN:

  • The incidental take of Pacific Halibut in the ocean troll salmon fishery by vessels with appropriate IPHC permits will reopen on a revised ratio and landing limit effective at 00:01 on Thursday, July 26. The limits will now be 1 Pacific Halibut per 3 Chinook (1 halibut may be landed outside of the ratio) with no more than 10 total halibut per trip.
RATIONALE: There are approximately 5,700 lbs. of halibut remaining on the incidental troll fishery quota of 35,620 lbs. Managers and industry discussed how to best access the remaining quota while minimizing the risk of exceeding the quota, and ended with settling on the revised ratios and trip limits that were approved.

7/13/18 ACTION NOTICE - Commercial Troll Salmon: NOAA Fisheries in consultation with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, representatives from the commercial troll fishery, and the Pacific Fishery Management Council, has taken in-season actions with respect to the retention of Pacific Halibut in the ocean troll fishery from the US/Canada Border to the US/Mexico Border. ACTION TAKEN:

  • The incidental take of Pacific Halibut in the ocean troll salmon fishery by vessels with appropriate IPHC permits will end at 23:59 on Saturday, July 14. All Pacific Halibut in possession must be landed and delivered no later the 23:59 on Sunday, July 15.

  • NOAA Fisheries will revisit the status of the remaining quota in the next week and consider a reopening with lower limits.

RATIONALE: Through July 11, an estimated 30,789 lbs. of Pacific Halibut had been landed out of the incidental troll fishery quota of 35,620 lbs., and leaving only 4,831 lbs. of the quota (13.6%). During the most recent week of landings, the Washington troll fleet had taken nearly the poundage that remains on the quota. By closing the retention of Pacific Halibut at this time, and insuring all landings are tallied, fishery managers can develop a more appropriate set of landing limits to complete the incidental Pacific Halibut quota while reducing the risk of exceeding the allocation.

 

6/27/2018 ACTION NOTICE: NOAA Fisheries in consultation with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, California Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, and the Pacific Fishery Management Council, has taken in-season action in the commercial troll salmon fishery in the area from Humbug Mt. to the Oregon/California Border.

ACTION TAKEN: The July Chinook salmon quota for the area from Humbug Mt. to the OR/CA Border is reduced on an impact neutral basis to account for the landings in excess of the June quota. The overage of 56 Chinook results in a reduction of 25 Chinook in the July quota with a revised quota of 1,975 Chinook for July.

RATIONALE: The June quota of 1,500 Chinook was exceeded during the first nine open days of fishing (June 4-12) with a total of 1,556 Chinook landed. The July season will open as scheduled with 50 Chinook per landing week (Thursday through Wednesday) per vessel for the open periods of July 5-12 and July 16-31 with the revised quota of 1,975 Chinook.

Participating vessels are reminded of the mandatory reporting of landings within one hour of delivery or prior to transport away from the port of landing. Reports may be made by phone to (541)867-0300 ext. 252 or by email to kmzor.trollreport@state.or.us. Report should include the vessel name and documentation number, the number of salmon being by species, the port of landing, the name of the fish buyer to whom the fish are being sold, and the estimated time of delivery.

 

6/14/2018 ACTION NOTICE: NOAA Fisheries in consultation with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, California Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, fishery representatives, and the Pacific Fishery Management Council, has taken in-season action in the commercial troll salmon fishery in the area from Humbug Mt. to the Oregon/California Border.

ACTION TAKEN: The commercial troll salmon fishery between Humbug Mt. and the Oregon California Border will remain closed to commercial troll salmon fishing for the remainder of June.

RATIONALE: The number of participating commercial vessels was higher than anticipated with 42 total boats making landings during the open period. This higher effort was primarily a result of very poor catches through May in all other areas in Oregon. The June quota of 1,500 Chinook was exceeded during the first nine open days of fishing (June 4-12) with a total of 1,511 Chinook landed. Managers will revisit the status of the fishery in late June to determine the number of fish that will need to be transferred from the July quota to cover the overage to the June quota. The July season will open as scheduled with 50 Chinook per landing week (Thursday through Wednesday) per vessel for the open periods of July 5-12 and July 16-31.

Participating vessels are reminded of the mandatory reporting of landings within one hour of delivery or prior to transport away from the port of landing. Reports may be made by phone to (541)867-0300 ext. 252 or by email to kmzor.trollreport@state.or.us. Report should include the vessel name and documentation number, the number of salmon being by species, the port of landing, the name of the fish buyer to whom the fish are being sold, and the estimated time of delivery.

 

5/30/18 ACTION NOTICE - Commercial Troll Salmon: NOAA Fisheries in consultation with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, representatives from the commercial troll fishery, and the Pacific Fishery Management Council, has taken in-season actions with respect to the commercial troll salmon fishery in the area from the US/Canada Border to Cape Falcon.

ACTIONS TAKEN:

  • For the commercial troll salmon fishery North of the Queets River beginning Thursday, May 31 and continuing through Monday, June 4: This area will re-open to salmon trolling with an open period limit of 35 Chinook per vessel. Vessels must land and deliver all catch within 24 hours of any closure in this fishery.
  • For the commercial troll salmon fishery from the Queets River to Leadbetter Pt., WA, beginning Thursday, May 31: The weekly landining and possession limit is increased from 100 to 200 Chinook per vessel per landing week (Thursday through Wednesday). Vessels must land and deliver all catch within 24 hours of any closure in this fishery.
  • For the commercial troll salmon fishery from theLeadbetter Pt., WA to Cape Falcon, OR, beginning Thursday, May 31: The weekly landining and possession limit is increased from 50 to 100 Chinook per vessel per landing week (Thursday through Wednesday). Vessels must land and deliver all catch within 24 hours of any closure in this fishery. All vessels fishing N of Leadbetter Pt. must land their fish N of Leadbetter Pt.
  • Vessels in possession of salmon caught between Leadbetter Pt., WA and Cape Falcon, OR must land their catch within the area from Leadbetter Pt, WA to Cape Falcon, OR or into Garibaldi, OR. Mandatory reporting within one hour of delivery or prior to transport away from the port of landing is required for all landings into Oregon at 541/867-0300 x271

RATIONALE: Through May 30 an estimated 6,938 Chinook have been landed out of the quota of 16,500 leaving 9,562 Chinook remaining to be caught. The area N of the Queets R. has only 1,214 Chinook remaining on the subarea cap in that zone. From Leadbetter Pt. to Cape Falcon, only 32 Chinook have been landed on the subarea cap of 4,600. The adopted changes will allow for better access of fishery participants to the remaining quota, and still maintain appropriate management control to insure that caps and the overall quota are not exceeded.

 

5/1/18 ACTION NOTICE: The 2018 ocean salmon regulations were published in the Federal Register on 4/30/18 and became effective on 5/1/2018.

 

4/20/18 ACTION NOTICE: The Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission met today in Astoria, Oregon and took action to adopt the suite of ocean recreational and commercial troll salmon seasons that were recently developed by the Pacific Fishery Management Council. In addition, the terminal area recreational and commercial fall Chinook seasons were adopted by the Commission for ocean waters adjacent to both the Elk River and the Chetco River.

Details are available at www.dfw.state.or.us/MRP/salmon/regulations/regindex.asp

4/10/18 OCEAN SALMON ACTION NOTICE: The Pacific Fishery Management Council finalized their recommendations for ocean salmon seasons on Tuesday, April 10. Draft copies of the adopted seasons will be available at the PMFC’s website in the near future (www.pcouncil.org), and graphics of the recreational and commercial troll seasons will also be available on www.dfw.state.or.us/mrp/salmon/ by Thursday, April 12. Seasons are not official until being given final approval by the Secretary of Commerce, and adopted by the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission for waters within 3 nautical miles of shore.

The adopted regulations reflect the continuing relatively low abundances for numerous ocean salmon populations. The Rogue River fall Chinook and Klamath River fall Chinook

populations both have shown improvements in the last year, and are expected to provide for improved Chinook salmon fishing this year off the Oregon Coast.

Recreational Season Summary:

Ocean waters off the Columbia River from Leadbetter Pt., Washington to Cape Falcon, Oregon will be open for recreational salmon fishing from June 23 through the earlier of September 3 or quota with a hatchery mark selective coho quota of 21,000 and a Chinook guideline of 8,000. The daily bag limit will be two salmon, but no more than one Chinook and all coho must have an adipose fin clip.

Recreational seasons on the central Oregon Coast (Cape Falcon to Humbug Mt.) opened for Chinook on March 15 and will continue through October 31 without interruption. Coho seasons will have quotas of 35,000 adipose fin-clipped coho in the hatchery mark selective season from June 30 through September 3, and an additional 3,500 coho quota in the September non-selective coho season that will be open each Friday and Saturday beginning on September 7 and continue through the earlier of September 29 or quota. In October, the recreational season will be restricted to salmon fishing only inside of the 40 fathom management line.

The area from Humbug Mt. to the OR/CA border will be open for recreational Chinook from May 19 through August 26.  A limited state waters fishery off the Chetco River in October will be considered by the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission in Astoria on April 20.

Commercial Troll Season Summary:

The commercial troll salmon seasons North of Cape Falcon will have a very limited coho salmon season again this year. The fishery will be managed by quotas, season length, and landing week (Thursday-Wednesday) limits. The early Chinook only season will start on May 1 and continue through the earlier of June 30 or the overall quota of 16,500 Chinook or the Leadbetter Pt. to Cape Falcon subarea cap of 4,600 Chinook. The summer fishery from July 1 through the earlier of the overall Chinook quota of 11,000, the overall quota of 5,600 coho, or the Leadbetter Point to Cape Falcon subarea cap of 1,300 Chinook. Landing week limits of 50 Chinook and 10 adipose fin-clipped coho will be in effect. Mandatory call-in requirements within an hour of landing are in place for all quota managed seasons.

From Cape Falcon to Humbug Mt. the Chinook seasons will have a number of open periods throughout the season starting on May 4 (May 4-14, May 19-31, June 4-12, June 16-30, July 5-12, July 16-31, August 3-7, August 13-17, August 25-29, and September 1 through October 31). Beginning September 1, a 50 Chinook weekly limit (Thursday through Wednesday) will be in place, and the fishery will be limited to fishing only shoreward of the 40 fathom curve during the month of October.

From Humbug Mt. to the OR/CA, the commercial troll fishery will be open for the same dates as listed for the Cape Falcon to Humbug Mt. area from May through August (May 4-14, May 19-31, June 4-12, June 16-30, July 5-12, July 16-31, August 3-7, August 13-17, and August 25-29).  However, monthly quotas of 1,500 in June, 2,000 in July, and 500 in August may result in seasons closing earlier in each month. Unused quota may be transferred forward to the next open quota period on an impact neutral basis. From June through August, landing week (Thursday-Wednesday) limits of 50 Chinook will be in effect. Mandatory call-in requirements within an hour of landing are in place for all quota managed seasons.

State waters fall Chinook terminal area fisheries are anticipated to be considered for waters adjacent to the Elk River and the Chetco River by the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission at their meeting in Astoria on April 20.

Other Information:

Both commercial troll salmon fishermen and recreational anglers should review the full regulations prior to participating in the ocean salmon fisheries. Commercial reporting requirements via phone or email remain in effect for all quota managed salmon seasons.

Questions should be directed to Eric Schindler at (541)867-0300 x252 or Justine Kenyon-Benson at (541)867-0300 x271.

 

3/13/18 COMMERCIAL TROLL SALMON ACTION NOTICE: The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) in consultation with the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC), the State of Oregon, and the State of California met this morning in Rohnert Park, California and have taken the following in-season management action to the scheduled March and April commercial troll Chinook salmon openings off Oregon:

ACTIONS TAKEN: 

(1) The commercial troll salmon fishery scheduled to open on March 15 in the area from Cape Falcon to Humbug Mt. will remain closed to commercial troll salmon fishing for the period of March 15 through April 30.

(2) The commercial troll salmon fishery scheduled to open on March 15 in the area from Humbug Mt. to the Oregon/California Border will remain closed to commercial troll salmon fishing for the period of March 15 through April 30. 

RATIONALE:  Fishery managers and industry representatives agreed that this closure was needed to reduce impacts on both Klamath River fall Chinook and Sacramento River fall Chinook in order to provide adequate opportunity as requested from fishery participants throughout the remainder of the fishing seasons that are currently under development.  The forecast abundance for a number of Chinook salmon populations that contribute to fisheries South of Cape Falcon are forecast at poor to fair abundances. 
Seasons from May 1, 2018 through April 30, 2019 are currently being developed. Season alternatives will be reviewed and a final season recommendation made at the Pacific Fishery Management Council public meeting April 5-11 in Portland, Oregon.

 

3/13/18 RECREATIONAL OCEAN SALMON ACTION NOTICE: The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) in consultation with the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC), the State of Oregon, and the State of California met this morning in Rohnert Park, California and have taken the following in-season management action to the scheduled March and April recreational ocean Chinook salmon openings off Oregon:

ACTION TAKEN:  The planned ocean Chinook salmon (all-salmon-except coho) season will open as scheduled from Cape Falcon to Humbug Mt. from March 15 through April 30, 2018.  The bag limit will be two salmon, except closed to retention of coho, with a minimum size of 24” for Chinook and a minimum size of 20” for steelhead.  Within 15 fathoms of depth off Tillamook between Twin Rocks and Pyramid Rock all retained Chinook must have a healed fin clip.

RATIONALE:  The recreational ocean fishery off Oregon in March and April has very low effort and Chinook catch.  Fishery managers and industry representatives agreed that this opening would not create any difficulty in developing the remainder of the ocean seasons for the 2018 fishing year.   Seasons from May 1, 2018 through April 30, 2019 are currently under development with final season recommendation made at the Pacific Fishery Management Council public meeting April 5-11 in Portland, Oregon.

Seasons from May 1, 2018 through April 30, 2019 are currently being developed. Season alternatives will be reviewed and a final season recommendation made at the Pacific Fishery Management Council public meeting April 5-11 in Portland, Oregon.

 

2018 PRE-SEASON PLANNING: OCEAN SALMON MEETING NOTICE: The 2018 Ocean Salmon Industry Group meeting (OSIG) is scheduled for Tuesday, February 27, 2018. This pre-season planning meeting will provide a review of the 2017 seasons, take a first look at the 2018 salmon forecasts, and develop a set of Oregon preferred recreational and commercial ocean salmon season concepts via public input to take forward through the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC) regulation setting process. The OSIG meeting will be held in the downstairs meeting room at the Hallmark Resort, 744 SW Elizabeth Street, Newport, OR.

The OSIG meeting is open to all ocean sport fishing anglers and charter operators, commercial salmon troll fishers, and any others interested in participating in the development of the 2018 ocean salmon seasons. Staff from ODFW will provide background materials and presentations and then work with meeting attendees to develop preferred season alternatives to use as guidance moving forward through the Pacific Fishery Management Council's season setting process. Doors open at 9:30 AM with presentations scheduled to start at 10:00 AM and conclude by 3:30 PM. There will be a lunch break between 12:00 PM and 1:15 PM,. Links to the agenda and briefing materials for the meeting will be posted here as they come available in January and February.

The first of the two salmon season setting meetings by the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC) will be held at the DoubleTree by Hilton Sonoma in Rohnert Park, California (One DoubleTree Drive, Rohnert Park, CA) from March 8-14. This first PFMC meeting in Rohnert Park will establish a range of alternatives for further review. The final season setting meeting will occur at the Sheraton Portland Airport Hotel (8235 Northeast Airport Way, Portland, OR) from April 5-11 (Note: Final action on the salmon seasons is tentatively scheduled for April 10). More information on these meetings can be found at the PFMC's website.

 

 

Project Overview

The Ocean Sampling Project (Ocean Salmon Management Program (OSMP)) monitors ocean commercial and recreational salmon fisheries for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). The project collects and analyzes data from Oregon's commercial and recreational ocean salmon fisheries, including catch and fishing effort, recovers these and other sources to assist in the develop of management.

The Ocean Sampling Project is made up of two sub-units: The Commercial Troll Salmon Project (CTSP) and the Ocean Recreational Boat Survey (ORBS). ORBS collects the information needed to managed all ocean recreational fisheries, and the CTSP collects the information needed information for managing the ocean commercial troll salmon fishery.

ORBS makes estimates of the ocean recreational catch and effort by boat type (charter and private). Interviews are conducted randomly of ocean boats to generate estimates of catch for both salmon and non-salmon species. All sampled salmon are examined for the presence of a CWT. Additional biological data are collected from salmon and non-salmon species, and anglers are also interviewed regarding released fish species.

The Ocean Sampling Project is staffed by a project leader and an assistant project leader at Newport, and two sampling coordinators; one each at Tillamook and Charleston. The sampling coordinators serve as liaison between field samplers, fishery participants, and program staff at Newport; deliver data and coded wire tags to Newport; and also provide additional sampling when needed. We regularly sample fishery landings at all primary Oregon coastal ports, utilizing approximately 20 to 30 seasonal samplers.

Contact:

Eric Schindler - Project Leader
E-mail: Eric.D.Schindler@state.or.us

Justine Kenyon-Benson - Assistant Project Leader
E-mail: Justine.Kenyon-Benson@state.or.us

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife
2040 SE Marine Science Drive
Newport, Oregon 97365
(541) 867-4741

 

link to Salmon Identification Guide

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